Prevalence and Clinical Significance of DSM-5-Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome in Adolescents and Young Adults in the General Population: The Bern Epidemiological At-Risk (BEAR) Study

Schultze-Lutter, Frauke; Michel, Chantal; Ruhrmann, Stephan; Schimmelmann, Benno Karl Edgar (2014). Prevalence and Clinical Significance of DSM-5-Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome in Adolescents and Young Adults in the General Population: The Bern Epidemiological At-Risk (BEAR) Study. Schizophrenia bulletin, 40(6), pp. 1499-1508. Oxford University Press 10.1093/schbul/sbt171

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Objective: Section III of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) lists attenuated psychosis syndrome as a condition for further study. One important question is its prevalence and clinical significance in the general population. Method: Analyses involved 1229 participants (age 16-40 years) from the general population of Canton Bern, Switzerland, enrolled from June 2011 to July 2012. "Symptom," "onset/worsening," "frequency," and "distress/disability" criteria of attenuated psychosis syndrome were assessed using the structured interview for psychosis-risk syndromes. Furthermore, help-seeking, psychosocial functioning, and current nonpsychotic axis I disorders were surveyed. Well-trained psychologists performed assessments using the computer-assisted telephone interviewing technique. Results: The symptom criterion was met by 12.9% of participants, onset/worsening by 1.1%, frequency by 3.8%, and distress/disability by 7.0%. Symptom, frequency, and distress/disability were met by 3.2%. Excluding trait-like attenuated psychotic symptoms (APS) decreased the prevalence to 2.6%, while adding onset/worsening reduced it to 0.3%. APS were associated with functional impairments, current mental disorders, and help-seeking although they were not a reason for help-seeking. These associations were weaker for attenuated psychosis syndrome. Conclusions: At the population level, only 0.3% met current attenuated psychosis syndrome criteria. Particularly, the onset/worsening criterion, originally included to increase the likelihood of progression to psychosis, lowered its prevalence. Because progression is not required for a self-contained syndrome, a revision of the restrictive onset criterion is proposed to avoid the exclusion of 2.3% of persons who experience and are distressed by APS from mental health care. Secondary analyses suggest that a revised syndrome would also possess higher clinical significance than the current syndrome.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy

UniBE Contributor:

Schultze-Lutter, Frauke; Michel, Chantal and Schimmelmann, Benno Karl Edgar

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0586-7614

Publisher:

Oxford University Press

Language:

English

Submitter:

Nicole Jansen

Date Deposited:

16 Jun 2014 07:35

Last Modified:

22 Jun 2015 16:05

Publisher DOI:

10.1093/schbul/sbt171

PubMed ID:

24353096

Uncontrolled Keywords:

attenuated psychosis syndrome, general population, prevalence, distress, disability, functional impairment

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.48965

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/48965

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