Oral mucosal findings related to tobacco use and alcohol consumption: a study on Swiss army recruits involving self-reported and clinical data

Morger, Reto; Ramseier, Christoph Andreas; Rees, Terry D; Bürgin, Walter B; Bornstein, Michael (2010). Oral mucosal findings related to tobacco use and alcohol consumption: a study on Swiss army recruits involving self-reported and clinical data. Oral health & preventive dentistry, 8(2), pp. 143-151. Berlin: Quintessenz Verlags-GmbH 10.3290/j.ohpd.a19208

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PURPOSE: The aim of the present study was to assess the oral mucosal health status of young male adults (aged 18 to 24 years) in Switzerland and to correlate their clinical findings with self-reported risk factors such as tobacco use and alcohol consumption. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data on the oral health status of 615 Swiss Army recruits were collected using a standardised self-reported questionnaire, followed by an intraoral examination. Positive clinical findings were classified as (1) common conditions and anatomical variants, (2) reactive lesions, (3) benign tumour lesions and (4) premalignant lesions. The main locations of the oral mucosal findings were recorded on a topographical classification chart. Using correlational statistics, the findings were further associated with the known risk factors such as tobacco use and alcohol consumption. RESULTS: A total of 468 findings were diagnosed in 327 (53.17%) of the 615 subjects. In total, 445 findings (95.09%) were classified as common conditions, anatomical variants and reactive soft-tissue lesions. In the group of reactive soft-tissue lesions, there was a significantly higher percentage of smokers (P < 0.001) and subjects with a combination of smoking and alcohol consumption (P < 0.001). Eight lesions were clinically diagnosed as oral leukoplakias associated with smokeless tobacco. The prevalence of precursor lesions in the population examined was over 1%. CONCLUSIONS: Among young male adults in Switzerland, a significant number of oral mucosal lesions can be identified, which strongly correlate with tobacco use. To improve primary and secondary prevention, young adults should therefore be informed more extensively about the negative effects of tobacco use on oral health.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > School of Dental Medicine > Department of Periodontology
04 Faculty of Medicine > School of Dental Medicine > Department of Oral Surgery and Stomatology

UniBE Contributor:

Morger, Reto; Ramseier, Christoph Andreas; Bürgin, Walter Bruno and Bornstein, Michael

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1602-1622

Publisher:

Quintessenz Verlags-GmbH

Language:

English

Submitter:

Eveline Carmen Schuler

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:08

Last Modified:

25 Jan 2017 12:16

Publisher DOI:

10.3290/j.ohpd.a19208

PubMed ID:

20589248

Web of Science ID:

000281116800006

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/493 (FactScience: 199504)

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