Religion and the Senses in Early Modern Europe

de Boer, Wietse; Göttler, Christine (eds.) (2013). Religion and the Senses in Early Modern Europe. Intersections: Vol. 26. Leiden: Brill 10.1163/9789004236653

Full text not available from this repository. (Request a copy)

Sensation is the subject of a burgeoning field in the humanities. This volume examines its role in the religious changes and transformations of early modern Europe. Sensation was not only central to the doctrinal disputes of the Reformation, but also critical in shaping new or reformed devotional practices. From this vantage point the book explores the intersections between the world of religion and the spheres of art, music, and literature; food and smell; sacred things and spaces; ritual and community; science and medicine. Deployed in varying, often contested ways, the senses were essential pathways to the sacred. They permitted knowledge of the divine and the universe, triggered affective responses, shaped holy environments, and served to heal, guide, or discipline body and soul.

Item Type:

Book (Edited Volume)

Division/Institute:

06 Faculty of Humanities > Department of Art and Cultural Studies > Institute of Art History > Recent and Modern Art History
06 Faculty of Humanities > Department of Art and Cultural Studies > Institute of Art History

UniBE Contributor:

Göttler, Christine

Subjects:

700 Arts

ISSN:

1568-1181

ISBN:

9789004236349

Series:

Intersections

Publisher:

Brill

Language:

English

Submitter:

Raphaèle Preisinger

Date Deposited:

01 Apr 2014 23:14

Last Modified:

02 Apr 2014 00:34

Publisher DOI:

10.1163/9789004236653

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/49626

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback