Emergency referrals for syncopes - is an ambulatory treatment safe?

Haltmeier, Simone Claudia; Lindner, Gregor; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis K.; Haberkern, Monika (2013). Emergency referrals for syncopes - is an ambulatory treatment safe? Praxis - schweizerische Rundschau für Medizin, 102(8), pp. 451-456. Huber 10.1024/1661-8157/a001252

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Patients after syncopy arrive frequently in an emergency unit. Two scoring systems have been validated for clinical decision making, use of diagnostic methods and need for hospitalisation. Goal of the study was quality control of ambulatory treatment of syncope patients in a University Emergency Department. 200 consecutive patients with syncope were documented, 109 of whom followed by phone-call during two years. The decision for hospitalisation or ambulatory treatment was up to the treating doctor. Age-distribution was biphasic: female sex mainly below the age 25, from 55 to 75 predominantly men. Etiology of syncope remained unclear for the majority of cases, a few neurologic (n=3) or cardiac (n=5) reasons were found with treatment consequences.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of General Internal Medicine (DAIM) > Clinic of General Internal Medicine > Centre of Competence for General Internal Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Intensive Care, Emergency Medicine and Anaesthesiology (DINA) > University Emergency Center
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of General Internal Medicine (DAIM) > Clinic of General Internal Medicine

UniBE Contributor:

Lindner, Gregor; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis and Haberkern Schläpfer, Monika

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1661-8157

Publisher:

Huber

Language:

English

Submitter:

Romana Saredi

Date Deposited:

16 Jun 2014 15:38

Last Modified:

11 Sep 2017 10:32

Publisher DOI:

10.1024/1661-8157/a001252

PubMed ID:

23570921

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.50534

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/50534

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