Disorganization and timing of motor behavior : insight from gesture impairments and movement patterns in schizophrenia

Walther, Sebastian; Ramseyer, Fabian; Tschacher, Wolfgang; Vanbellingen, Tim; Strik, Werner; Bohlhalter, Stephan (7 April 2014). Disorganization and timing of motor behavior : insight from gesture impairments and movement patterns in schizophrenia (Unpublished). In: 4th Biennial Schizophrenia International Research Society Conference. Florence, Italy. 05.-09.04.2014.

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Background: Motor symptoms are frequent phenomena across the entire course of schizophrenia1. Some have argued that disorganized behavior was associated with aberrant motor behavior. We have studied the association of motor disturbances and disorganization in two projects focusing on the timing of movements. Method: In two studies, we assessed motor behavior and psychopathology. The first study applied a validated test of upper limb apraxia in 30 schizophrenia patients2,3. We used standardized video assessments of hand gestures by a blinded rater. The second study tested the stability of movement patterns using time series analysis in actigraphy data of 100 schizophrenia patients4. Both stability of movement patterns and the overall amount of movement were calculated from data of two hours with high degrees of social interaction comparable across the 100 subjects. Results: In total, 67% of the patients had gesture performance deficits3. Most frequently, they made spatial, temporal and body-part-as-object errors. Gesture performance relied on frontal lobe function2. Poor gesture performance was associated with increased disorganization scores. In the second study, we found disorganization to be predicted only by more irregular movement patterns irrespective of the overall amount of movement4. Conclusion : Both studies provide evidence for a link between aberrant timing of motor behavior and disorganization. Disturbed movement control seems critical for disorganized behavior in schizophrenia.

Item Type:

Conference or Workshop Item (Poster)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Management
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > DCR Unit Sahli Building > Forschungsgruppe Neurologie
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Dermatology, Urology, Rheumatology, Nephrology, Osteoporosis (DURN) > Clinic of Rheumatology, Clinical Immunology and Allergology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Psychotherapy

UniBE Contributor:

Walther, Sebastian; Ramseyer, Fabian; Tschacher, Wolfgang; Vanbellingen, Tim; Strik, Werner and Bohlhalter, Stephan

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

Language:

English

Submitter:

Sebastian Walther

Date Deposited:

01 Oct 2014 14:07

Last Modified:

21 May 2015 12:38

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.51169

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/51169

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