Mechanisms of species divergence through visual adaptation and sexual selection: Perspectives from a cichlid model system

Maan, Martine E.; Seehausen, Ole (2010). Mechanisms of species divergence through visual adaptation and sexual selection: Perspectives from a cichlid model system. Current zoology, 56(3), pp. 285-299. Beijing (China): Chinese Academy of sciences

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The theory of ecological speciation suggests that assortative mating evolves most easily when mating preferences are;directly linked to ecological traits that are subject to divergent selection. Sensory adaptation can play a major role in this process,;because selective mating is often mediated by sexual signals: bright colours, complex song, pheromone blends and so on. When;divergent sensory adaptation affects the perception of such signals, mating patterns may change as an immediate consequence.;Alternatively, mating preferences can diverge as a result of indirect effects: assortative mating may be promoted by selection;against intermediate phenotypes that are maladapted to their (sensory) environment. For Lake Victoria cichlids, the visual environment;constitutes an important selective force that is heterogeneous across geographical and water depth gradients. We investigate;the direct and indirect effects of this heterogeneity on the evolution of female preferences for alternative male nuptial colours;(red and blue) in the genus Pundamilia. Here, we review the current evidence for divergent sensory drive in this system, extract;general principles, and discuss future perspectives

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Ecology and Evolution (IEE) > Aquatic Ecology

UniBE Contributor:

Maan, Martine and Seehausen, Ole

ISSN:

1674-5507

Publisher:

Chinese Academy of sciences

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:17

Last Modified:

06 Dec 2013 13:25

Web of Science ID:

000278715600004

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/5256 (FactScience: 209987)

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