Discrete Improvement in Racial Disparity in Survival among Patients with Stage IV Colorectal Cancer: a 21-Year Population-Based Analysis

Castleberry, A. W.; Güller, Ulrich; Tarantino, I.; Berry, M. F.; Brügger, Lukas; Warschkow, R.; Cerny, Thomas; Mantyh, C. R.; Candinas, Daniel; Worni, Mathias (2014). Discrete Improvement in Racial Disparity in Survival among Patients with Stage IV Colorectal Cancer: a 21-Year Population-Based Analysis. Journal of gastrointestinal surgery, 18(6), pp. 1194-1204. Springer 10.1007/s11605-014-2515-3

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Purpose Recently, multiple clinical trials have demonstrated improved outcomes in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. This study investigated if the improved survival is race dependent. Patients and Methods Overall and cancer-specific survival of 77,490 White and Black patients with metastatic colorectal cancer from the 1988–2008 Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results registry were compared using unadjusted and multivariable adjusted Cox proportional hazard regression as well as competing risk analyses. Results Median age was 69 years, 47.4 % were female and 86.0 % White. Median survival was 11 months overall, with an overall increase from 8 to 14 months between 1988 and 2008. Overall survival increased from 8 to 14 months for White, and from 6 to 13 months for Black patients. After multivariable adjustment, the following parameters were associated with better survival: White, female, younger, better educated and married patients, patients with higher income and living in urban areas, patients with rectosigmoid junction and rectal cancer, undergoing cancer-directed surgery, having well/moderately differentiated, and N0 tumors (p<0.05 for all covariates). Discrepancies in overall survival based on race did not change significantly over time; however, there was a significant decrease of cancer-specific survival discrepancies over time between White and Black patients with a hazard ratio of 0.995 (95 % confidence interval 0.991–1.000) per year (p=0.03). Conclusion A clinically relevant overall survival increase was found from 1988 to 2008 in this population-based analysis for both White and Black patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Although both White and Black patients benefitted from this improvement, a slight discrepancy between the two groups remained.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gastro-intestinal, Liver and Lung Disorders (DMLL) > Clinic of Visceral Surgery and Medicine > Visceral Surgery

UniBE Contributor:

Güller, Ulrich; Brügger, Lukas; Cerny, Thomas; Candinas, Daniel and Worni, Mathias

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1091-255X

Publisher:

Springer

Language:

English

Submitter:

Lilian Karin Smith-Wirth

Date Deposited:

10 Oct 2014 16:56

Last Modified:

06 Nov 2015 09:47

Publisher DOI:

10.1007/s11605-014-2515-3

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Metastatic colorectal cancer. Colon cancer. Rectal cancer. Race. Disparity. Ethnicity. Survival

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.53180

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/53180

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