Perceptual learning of motion discrimination by mental imagery.

Tartaglia, Elisa M.; Bamert, Laura; Herzog, Michael H.; Mast, Fred W. (2012). Perceptual learning of motion discrimination by mental imagery. Journal of vision, 12(6), pp. 1-10. ARVO 10.1167/12.6.14

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Perceptual learning can occur when stimuli are only imagined, i.e., without proper stimulus presentation. For example, perceptual learning improved bisection discrimination when only the two outer lines of the bisection stimulus were presented and the central line had to be imagined. Performance improved also with other static stimuli. In non-learning imagery experiments, imagining static stimuli is different from imagining motion stimuli. We hypothesized that those differences also affect imagery perceptual learning. Here, we show that imagery training also improves motion direction discrimination. Learning occurs when no stimulus at all is presented during training, whereas no learning occurs when only noise is presented. The interference between noise and mental imagery possibly hinders learning. For static bisection stimuli, the pattern is just the opposite. Learning occurs when presented with the two outer lines of the bisection stimulus, i.e., with only a part of the visual stimulus, while no learning occurs when no stimulus at all is presented.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology > Cognitive Psychology, Perception and Methodology

UniBE Contributor:

Mast, Fred

Subjects:

100 Philosophy > 150 Psychology

ISSN:

1534-7362

Publisher:

ARVO

Language:

English

Submitter:

Andrea Stettler

Date Deposited:

30 May 2014 12:05

Last Modified:

30 May 2014 12:05

Publisher DOI:

10.1167/12.6.14

PubMed ID:

22693332

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/53241

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