Differences in coping, self-efficacy, and external control beliefs between patients at-risk for psychosis and patients with first-episode psychosis

Schmidt, Stefanie Julia; Grunert, Vera-Maria; Schimmelmann, Benno Karl Edgar; Schultze-Lutter, Frauke; Michel, Chantal (2014). Differences in coping, self-efficacy, and external control beliefs between patients at-risk for psychosis and patients with first-episode psychosis. Psychiatry research, 219(1), pp. 95-102. Elsevier 10.1016/j.psychres.2014.04.045

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Patients with first-episode psychosis (FEP) often show dysfunctional coping patterns, low self-efficacy, and external control beliefs that are considered to be risk factors for the development of psychosis. Therefore, these factors should already be present in patients at-risk for psychosis (AR). We compared frequencies of deficits in coping strategies (Stress-Coping-Questionnaires, SVF-120/SVF-KJ), self-efficacy, and control beliefs (Competence and Control Beliefs Questionnaire, FKK) between AR (n=21) and FEP (n=22) patients using a cross-sectional design. Correlations among coping, self-efficacy, and control beliefs were assessed in both groups. The majority of AR and FEP patients demonstrated deficits in coping skills, self-efficacy, and control beliefs. However, AR patients more frequently reported a lack of positive coping strategies, low self-efficacy, and a fatalistic externalizing bias. In contrast, FEP patients were characterized by being overly self-confident. These findings suggest that dysfunctional coping, self-efficacy, and control beliefs are already evident in AR patients, though different from those in FEP patients. The pattern of deficits in AR patients closely resembles that of depressive patients, which may reflect high levels of depressiveness in AR patients. Apart from being worthwhile treatment targets, these coping and belief patterns are promising candidates for predicting outcome in AR patients, including the conversion to psychosis

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy

UniBE Contributor:

Schmidt, Stefanie Julia; Grunert, Vera-Maria; Schimmelmann, Benno Karl Edgar; Schultze-Lutter, Frauke and Michel, Chantal

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0165-1781

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Nicole Jansen

Date Deposited:

23 Sep 2014 16:52

Last Modified:

11 Nov 2015 11:39

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.psychres.2014.04.045

PubMed ID:

24878297

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.53280

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/53280

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