Bottom-up effects of plant diversity on multitrophic interactions in a biodiversity experiment

Scherber, Christoph; Eisenhauer, Nico; Weisser, Wolfgang W.; Schmid, Bernhard; Voigt, Winfried; Fischer, Markus; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef; Roscher, Christiane; Weigelt, Alexandra; Allan, Eric; Beßler, Holger; Bonkowski, Michael; Buchmann, Nina; Buscot, François; Clement, Lars W.; Ebeling, Anne; Engels, Christof; Halle, Stefan; Kertscher, Ilona; Klein, Alexandra-Maria; ... (2010). Bottom-up effects of plant diversity on multitrophic interactions in a biodiversity experiment. Nature, 468(7323), pp. 553-556. London: Macmillan Journals Ltd. 10.1038/nature09492

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Biodiversity is rapidly declining, and this may negatively affect ecosystem processes, including economically important ecosystem services. Previous studies have shown that biodiversity has positive effects on organisms and processes across trophic levels. However, only a few studies have so far incorporated an explicit food-web perspective. In an eight-year biodiversity experiment, we studied an unprecedented range of above- and below-ground organisms and multitrophic interactions. A multitrophic data set originating from a single long-term experiment allows mechanistic insights that would not be gained from meta-analysis of different experiments. Here we show that plant diversity effects dampen with increasing trophic level and degree of omnivory. This was true both for abundance and species richness of organisms. Furthermore, we present comprehensive above-ground/below-ground biodiversity food webs. Both above ground and below ground, herbivores responded more strongly to changes in plant diversity than did carnivores or omnivores. Density and richness of carnivorous taxa was independent of vegetation structure. Below-ground responses to plant diversity were consistently weaker than above-ground responses. Responses to increasing plant diversity were generally positive, but were negative for biological invasion, pathogen infestation and hyperparasitism. Our results suggest that plant diversity has strong bottom-up effects on multitrophic interaction networks, with particularly strong effects on lower trophic levels. Effects on higher trophic levels are indirectly mediated through bottom-up trophic cascades.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Plant Sciences (IPS)
08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Plant Sciences (IPS) > Plant Ecology
08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Plant Sciences (IPS) > Biodiversity

UniBE Contributor:

Fischer, Markus and Allan, Eric

Subjects:

500 Science > 580 Plants (Botany)

ISSN:

0028-0836

Publisher:

Macmillan Journals Ltd.

Language:

English

Submitter:

Peter Alfred von Ballmoos-Haas

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:18

Last Modified:

06 Dec 2014 14:16

Publisher DOI:

10.1038/nature09492

PubMed ID:

20981010

Web of Science ID:

000284584200040

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.5399

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/5399 (FactScience: 210142)

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