Stomatal opening at elevated temperature: an underestimated regulatory mechanism?

Feller, Urs (2007). Stomatal opening at elevated temperature: an underestimated regulatory mechanism? General and Applied Plant Physiology, 32(1), pp. 19-31. Acad. M. Popov, Institute of Plant Physiology

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Climate models predict more frequent and more severe extreme events (e.g. heat waves, extended drought periods) in Europe during the next decades. The response of plants to elevated temperature is a key issue in this context. Stomatal regulation is not only relevant for the diffusion of CO2 from the ambient air into the leaves, but it plays also an important role for the control of transpiration and leaf cooling. The regulation of stomatal aperture by the water status (hydroactive and hydropassive feed-back) and by internal CO2 availability (CO2 feed-back) are well documented in the literature, while the response of the stomates to elevated temperature was far less considered in the past. Photosynthesis is negatively affected by elevated temperature, but the water loss via transpiration may still be high. In the experiments reported here, bean leaf segments were incubated in darkness floating on water in the range from 20 to 50°C and then analyzed immediately by taking a photograph with a digital microscope. Stomatal aperture was measured on these pictures in order to quantify stomatal opening. After the incubation for 30 min, the opening was 0.66, 2.76 and 4.28 μm at 23, 30 and 35°C respectively. This opening at elevated temperature was fully reversible. Abscisic acid (0.1 μM) in the incubation medium shifted the temperature for stomatal opening to higher values. It can be concluded that elevated temperature stimulates stomatal opening regardless of the CO2 assimilation status and that there is a trade-off between leaf cooling on one hand and limiting water loss during drought periods on the other hand.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Plant Sciences (IPS) > Plant nutrition [discontinued]
08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Plant Sciences (IPS)

UniBE Contributor:

Feller, Urs

Subjects:

500 Science > 580 Plants (Botany)

ISSN:

1310-4586

Publisher:

Acad. M. Popov, Institute of Plant Physiology

Language:

English

Submitter:

Peter Alfred von Ballmoos-Haas

Date Deposited:

15 Aug 2014 08:46

Last Modified:

27 Jul 2016 06:53

Additional Information:

Special Issue: Proceedings of the International Workshop 'Sustainability, Stress and the Bases of Plant Resistance' 'PISA'-06

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Drought, Global change, Heat, Leaf temperature, Regulation, Stomates

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.53995

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/53995

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