Minderung physiologischer Reaktivität auf psychosozialen Stress durch Taiji-Training - wer profitiert besonders? Eine Untersuchung moderierender Effekte von selbstberichteter dispositioneller psychologischer Stressreaktivität und Achtsamkeit.

Nedeljkovic, Marko; Ausfeld-Hafter, Brigitte; Seiler, Roland; Wirtz, Petra H. (2012). Minderung physiologischer Reaktivität auf psychosozialen Stress durch Taiji-Training - wer profitiert besonders? Eine Untersuchung moderierender Effekte von selbstberichteter dispositioneller psychologischer Stressreaktivität und Achtsamkeit. Zeitschrift f�r medizinische Psychologie, 21(4), pp. 161-169. Akad. Verl.-Ges. Aka 10.3233/ZMP-2012-210011

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Theoretical background and objectives: Stress reducing effects of Taiji practice have been repeatedly reported. The aim of the present study was to investigate which persons benefit the most from Taiji practice in terms of reduced physiological stress reactivity. Methods: We conducted a secondary data analysis of a randomized controlled Taiji trial that significantly lowered stress reactivity of salivary cortisol and alpha-amylase in a Taiji group (n = 26) compared to a control group (n = 23). By using hierarchical regression analyses potential moderating influences of self-reported trait-mindfulness and trait values of general psychological stress reactivity on stress protective effects of a three months Taiji training were examined. Moderator variables were assessed at the beginning of the study using the Freiburg-Mindfulness-Inventory and the Perceived- Stress-Reactivity-Scale. Results: The interaction effect "study group x mindfulness" was significant for stress reactivity of salivary alpha-amylase (p = 0.050). Participants in the Taiji group with higher trait-mindfulness showed a lower salivary alpha-amylase stress reactivity, while in the control group higher trait-mindfulness was associated with higher alpha-amylase stress reactivity. In the control group (p = 0.042) but not in the Taiji group (p = 0.69) salivary cortisol stress reactivity was significantly increased in persons with higher trait-mindfulness scores. We could not find moderating effects of general psychological stress reactivity. Conclusion: Our results suggest that without intervention higher trait-mindfulness is associated with increased physiological stress reactivity. Persons with higher trait-mindfulness seem to benefit the most from practicing Taiji in terms of reduced sympathetic stress reactivity.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology > Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy
07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Sport Science (ISPW)
07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Sport Science (ISPW) > Sport Science II

UniBE Contributor:

Seiler, Roland and Wirtz, Petra Hedwig

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
100 Philosophy > 150 Psychology
700 Arts > 790 Sports, games & entertainment

ISSN:

0940-5569

Publisher:

Akad. Verl.-Ges. Aka

Submitter:

Corinne Ammann

Date Deposited:

01 Jul 2014 15:37

Last Modified:

08 Jan 2015 07:17

Publisher DOI:

10.3233/ZMP-2012-210011

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Taiji, Achtsamkeit, psychosozialer Stress, Stressreaktivität, Speichelcortisol, Speichel-Alpha-Amylase Taiji, mindfulness, psychosocial stress, stress reactivity, salivary cortisol, salivary alpha-amylase

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.54115

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/54115

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