The near babylonian speech confusion in early detection of psychosis

Schultze-Lutter, Frauke; Schimmelmann, Benno G; Ruhrmann, Stephan (2011). The near babylonian speech confusion in early detection of psychosis. Schizophrenia bulletin, 37(4), pp. 653-655. Oxford: Oxford University Press 10.1093/schbul/sbr039

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It is barely 15 years since, in 1996, the issue theme of Schizophrenia Bulletin (Vol 22, 2) “Early Detection, and Intervention in Schizophrenia” signified the commencement of this field of research. Since that time the field of early detection research has developed rapidly and it may be translated into clinical practice by the introduction of an Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome in Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, (DSM-5) (www.dsm5.org/ProposedRevisions/Pages/proposedrevision.aspx?rid=412#). Attenuated psychotic symptoms (APS) had first been suggested as a clinical predictor of first-episode psychosis by the Personal Assessment and Crisis Evaluation (PACE) Clinic group as part of the ultrahigh risk (UHR) criteria.1 The term ultrahigh risk became broadly accepted for this set of criteria for imminent risk of developing psychosis in the late 1990s. The use of the term “prodrome” for a state characterized by at-risk (AR) criteria was criticized as a retrospective concept inevitably followed by the full-blown disorder.1 Although alternative terms have been suggested, prodrome is still used in prospective studies (eg, prodromally symptomatic, potentially or putatively prodromal, prodrome-like state/symptoms). Some alternative suggestions such as prepsychotic state/symptoms, subthreshold psychotic symptoms, early psychosis, subsyndromal psychosis, hypopsychosis, or subpsychosis were short-lived. Other terms still in use include UHR, at-risk mental state (ARMS), AR, high risk, clinical high risk (CHR), or early and late AR state. Further, the term psychotic-like experiences (PLEs) has recently (re-)entered early detection research. …

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy

UniBE Contributor:

Schultze-Lutter, Frauke and Schimmelmann, Benno Karl Edgar

ISSN:

0586-7614

Publisher:

Oxford University Press

Language:

English

Submitter:

Myriam Pyrlik

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:18

Last Modified:

04 Apr 2014 01:13

Publisher DOI:

10.1093/schbul/sbr039

PubMed ID:

21558142

Web of Science ID:

000292527400001

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/5796 (FactScience: 210630)

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