Disturbed cortico–amygdalar functional connectivity as pathophysiological correlate of working memory deficits in bipolar affective disorder

Stegmayer, Katharina; Usher, Juliana; Trost, Sarah; Henseler, Ilona; Tost, Heike; Rietschel, Marcella; Falkai, Peter; Gruber, Oliver (2015). Disturbed cortico–amygdalar functional connectivity as pathophysiological correlate of working memory deficits in bipolar affective disorder. European archives of psychiatry and clinical neuroscience, 265(4), pp. 303-311. Springer 10.1007/s00406-014-0517-5

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Patients suffering from bipolar affective disorder show deficits in working memory functions. In a previous functional magnetic resonance imaging study, we observed an abnormal hyperactivity of the amygdala in bipolar patients during articulatory rehearsal in verbal working memory. In the present study, we investigated the dynamic neurofunctional interactions between the right amygdala and the brain systems that underlie verbal working memory in both bipolar patients and healthy controls. In total, 18 euthymic bipolar patients and 18 healthy controls performed a modified version of the Sternberg item-recognition (working memory) task. We used the psychophysiological interaction approach in order to assess functional connectivity between the right amygdala and the brain regions involved in verbal working memory. In healthy subjects, we found significant negative functional interactions between the right amygdala and multiple cortical brain areas involved in verbal working memory. In comparison with the healthy control subjects, bipolar patients exhibited significantly reduced functional interactions of the right amygdala particularly with the right-hemispheric, i.e., ipsilateral, cortical regions supporting verbal working memory. Together with our previous finding of amygdala hyperactivity in bipolar patients during verbal rehearsal, the present results suggest that a disturbed right-hemispheric “cognitive–emotional” interaction between the amygdala and cortical brain regions underlying working memory may be responsible for amygdala hyperactivation and affects verbal working memory (deficits) in bipolar patients.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Management

UniBE Contributor:

Stegmayer, Katharina Deborah Lena

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0940-1334

Publisher:

Springer

Language:

English

Submitter:

Katharina Stegmayer

Date Deposited:

14 Oct 2014 10:40

Last Modified:

15 Oct 2020 07:15

Publisher DOI:

10.1007/s00406-014-0517-5

PubMed ID:

25119145

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Amygdala, Functional coupling, Functional magnetic resonance imaging, Limbic system, Euthymia

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.58523

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/58523

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