The effects of doxycycline on nitric oxide and stromelysin production in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture

Jauernig, S.; Schweighauser, Ariane; Reist, M.; Von Rechenberg, Brigitte; Schawalder, Peter; Spreng, David (1999). The effects of doxycycline on nitric oxide and stromelysin production in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture. Veterinary surgery, 30(2), pp. 132-139. Wiley-Blackwell

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OBJECTIVE To investigate the potential of doxycycline to reduce stromelysin and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity in dogs with osteoarthritis (OA) secondary to spontaneous cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) rupture. STUDY DESIGN Prospective, clinical study. ANIMALS Eighty-one dogs with OA secondary to CCL rupture and 54 normal dogs. METHODS Dogs with OA secondary to CCL rupture were divided into 2 groups before surgery. The Doxy-CCl group received 3 to 4 mg/kg doxycycline orally every 24 hours for 7 to 10 days (n = 35). The CCL group received no treatment (n = 46). Synovial fluid, articular cartilage, synovial membrane, and CCL samples were collected during surgery (Doxy-CCL group and CCL group) or immediately after euthanasia from healthy dogs (control group). Synovial fluid samples were examined cytologically. Total nitric oxide (NOt) concentrations were measured in the supernatant of explant cultures of all tissue samples, and stromelysin activity was measured in the supernatant of explant cultures of cartilage. RESULTS NOt concentrations measured in cartilage were significantly lower in the Doxy-CCL group than in the CCL group, but were not different from those measured in the control group. Doxycycline treatment did not have a significant effect on cartilage stromelysin levels. CONCLUSION The findings in this study indicate that doxycycline inhibits NO production in cartilage in dogs with CCL rupture. CLINICAL RELEVANCE Doxycycline may have a role in the treatment of canine OA by inhibiting NO production.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > Small Animal Clinic > Small Animal Clinic, Surgery
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > Small Animal Clinic

UniBE Contributor:

Schweighauser, Ariane; Schawalder, Peter and Spreng, David

Subjects:

500 Science
600 Technology > 630 Agriculture

ISSN:

0161-3499

Publisher:

Wiley-Blackwell

Language:

English

Submitter:

Simone Forterre

Date Deposited:

15 Sep 2014 13:15

Last Modified:

08 Jan 2015 20:21

PubMed ID:

11230767

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.58567

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/58567

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