Endoscopic ultrasonography for the diagnosis of intrathoracic lesions in two dogs.

Gaschen, L.; Kircher, Patrick Robert; Hoffmann, G.; Luckschander, Nicole; Schmökel, Hugo; Spreng, David; Lang, Johann (2003). Endoscopic ultrasonography for the diagnosis of intrathoracic lesions in two dogs. Veterinary radiology & ultrasound, 44(3), pp. 292-299. Blackwell 10.1111/j.1740-8261.2003.tb00458.x

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Endoscopic ultrasound was developed initially in humans to overcome limitations of conventional ultrasound in examining certain internal organs due to intervening bone or air-filled structures. Endoscopic ultrasound has been used most widely in investigation of the gastrointestinal tract in humans, but many intrathoracic applications as well as endoscopic ultrasound-guided techniques have recently been described. Mediastinal and pulmonary structures can be examined with endoscopic ultrasound since a high frequency ultrasound probe can be brought into close contact with the areas of interest via a transesophageal approach. The purpose of this report is to describe the application of endoscopic ultrasound as an aid in the diagnosis of intrathoracic disease in the dog. Two dogs, one with a history of prior esophageal foreign body extraction, the other with apathy, weakness and dyspnea were referred for further investigation. Both dogs had caudal intrathoracic soft tissue opacities diagnosed radiographically, but their origin and nature were difficult to determine. Conventional ultrasound was limiting in both dogs due to their location and superimposition of gas-filled structures. With endosonography lesions were characterized more completely. We have found endoscopic ultrasound to be an elegant diagnostic tool for the investigation of radiographically detected intrathoracic lesions in the dog whose origins are difficult to determine or do not lend themselves to investigation by conventional ultrasound. Endoscopic ultrasound provides valuable diagnostic information complementary to that provided radiographically which aids in therapeutic planning. Endoscopic ultrasound was also more sensitive for detecting mediastinal lymphadenomegaly than radiography in one of the dogs. An additional advantage of endoscopic ultrasound is the fact that US-guided tissue sampling can be performed during the examination.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > Small Animal Clinic > Small Animal Clinic, Internal Medicine
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > Small Animal Clinic > Small Animal Clinic, Surgery
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > DKV - Clinical Radiology
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > Small Animal Clinic

UniBE Contributor:

Gaschen, L.; Kircher, Patrick Robert; Luckschander, Nicole; Schmökel, Hugo; Spreng, David and Lang, Johann

Subjects:

600 Technology > 630 Agriculture

ISSN:

1058-8183

Publisher:

Blackwell

Language:

English

Submitter:

Simone Forterre

Date Deposited:

24 Sep 2014 15:30

Last Modified:

14 Jan 2015 14:07

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/j.1740-8261.2003.tb00458.x

PubMed ID:

12816371

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.58573

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/58573

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