Accuracy of the withdrawal reflex for localization of the site of cervical disk herniation in dogs: 35 cases (2004-2007)

Forterre, Franck; Konar, Martin; Tomek, Ales; Doherr, Marcus; Howard, J.; Spreng, David; Vandevelde, Marc; Jaggy, André (2008). Accuracy of the withdrawal reflex for localization of the site of cervical disk herniation in dogs: 35 cases (2004-2007). Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 232(4), pp. 559-563. American Veterinary Medical Association 10.2460/javma.232.4.559

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OBJECTIVE To evaluate the accuracy of neurologic examination versus magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in localization of cervical disk herniation and evaluate the usefulness of withdrawal reflex testing in dogs. DESIGN Retrospective case series. ANIMALS 35 client-owned dogs with a single-level cervical disk herniation as determined via MRI. PROCEDURES 1 of 2 board-certified neurologists performed a complete neurologic examination in each dog. Clinical signs of a cervical lesion included evidence of neck pain and tetraparesis. The withdrawal reflex was used for neuroanatomic localization (C1-C5 or C6-T2). Agreement between results of neurologic and MRI examinations was determined. RESULTS Agreement between neurologic and MRI diagnoses was 65.8%. In 11 dogs in which the lesion was clinically localized to the C6-T2 segment on the basis of a decreased withdrawal reflex in the forelimbs, MRI revealed an isolated C1-C5 disk lesion. In 1 dog, in which the lesion was suspected to be at the C1-C5 level, MRI revealed a C6-T2 lesion. Cranial cervical lesions were significantly associated with an incorrect neurologic diagnosis regarding site of the lesion. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that the withdrawal reflex in dogs with cervical disk herniation is not reliable for determining the affected site and that a decreased withdrawal reflex does not always indicate a lesion from C6 to T2.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > DKV - Central Clinical Laboratory
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > DKV - Clinical Neurology
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > Small Animal Clinic > Small Animal Clinic, Surgery
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > DKV - Clinical Radiology
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > Small Animal Clinic
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH) > Veterinary Public Health Institute

UniBE Contributor:

Forterre, Franck; Konar, Martin; Tomek, Ales; Doherr, Marcus; Howard, Judith; Spreng, David; Vandevelde, Marc and Jaggy, André

Subjects:

500 Science
600 Technology > 630 Agriculture

ISSN:

0003-1488

Publisher:

American Veterinary Medical Association

Language:

English

Submitter:

Simone Forterre

Date Deposited:

24 Sep 2014 13:48

Last Modified:

22 Jul 2015 07:49

Publisher DOI:

10.2460/javma.232.4.559

PubMed ID:

18279092

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.58581

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/58581

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