Physiologic and pathophysiologic fundamentals of proteinuria a review

Raila, Jens; Forterre, Simone; Schweigert, Florian J (2005). Physiologic and pathophysiologic fundamentals of proteinuria a review. Berliner und Münchener tierärztliche Wochenschrift, 118(5-6), pp. 229-239. Schlütersche

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The term proteinuria is taken to mean abnormally high protein excretion in the urine. Proteinuria is the consequence of glomerular filtration of plasma proteins, their subsequent reabsorption by the proximal tubular cells and secretion of protein by the tubular cells and distal urinary tract. In physiological conditions, the structural integry of the glomerular filtration barrier prevents the abnormal passage of albumin (molecular mass 66 kDa) and high-molecular-weight proteins (> 66 kDa), whereas the passage of low-molecular-weight proteins (< 66 kDa) is almost completely unrestricted. Proteins that arrive the tubular lumen are reabsorbed by endocytosis after binding to the megalin-cubilin complex. An increased load of proteins in the tubular lumen leads to the saturation of the reabsorptive mechanism and higher urinary protein excretion. Proteinuria can originate from prerenal, renal and postrenal causes. Elevated tubular protein concentrations have been recognized to be toxic to tubular cells and associated with the progression of chronic renal disease. Therefore, the quantitative and qualitative evaluation of proteinuria is important for the diagnosis of renal disease.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Review Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > Small Animal Clinic > Small Animal Clinic, Surgery
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > Small Animal Clinic

UniBE Contributor:

Forterre, Simone

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
600 Technology > 630 Agriculture

ISSN:

0005-9366

Publisher:

Schlütersche

Language:

German

Submitter:

Simone Forterre

Date Deposited:

25 Sep 2014 14:46

Last Modified:

25 Sep 2014 14:46

PubMed ID:

15918488

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/58813

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