Detection and quantification of leptospires in urine of dogs: a maintenance host for the zoonotic disease leptospirosis.

Rojas, P; Monahan, A M; Schuller, Simone; Miller, I S; Markey, B K; Nally, J E (2010). Detection and quantification of leptospires in urine of dogs: a maintenance host for the zoonotic disease leptospirosis. European journal of clinical microbiology & infectious diseases, 29(10), pp. 1305-1309. Springer 10.1007/s10096-010-0991-2

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Leptospirosis is a global zoonotic disease. Pathogenic Leptospira species, the causative agent of leptospirosis, colonize the renal tubules of chronically infected maintenance hosts such as dogs, rats and cattle. Maintenance hosts typically remain clinically asymptomatic and shed leptospires into the environment via urine. In contrast, accidental hosts such as humans can suffer severe acute forms of the disease. Infection results from direct contact with infected urine or indirectly, through contaminated water sources. In this study, a quantitative real-time PCR specific for lipL32 was designed to detect the urinary shedding of leptospires from dogs. The sensitivity and specificity of the assay was evaluated using both a panel of pathogenic Leptospira species and clinical microbial isolates, and samples of urine collected from experimentally infected rats and non-infected controls. The lower limit of detection was approximately 3 genome equivalents per reaction. The assay was applied to canine urine samples collected from local dog sanctuaries and the University Veterinary Hospital (UVH) at University College Dublin. Of 525 canine urine samples assayed, 37 were positive, indicating a prevalence of urinary shedding of leptospires of 7.05%. These results highlight the need to provide effective canine vaccination strategies and raise public health awareness.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > Small Animal Clinic
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > Small Animal Clinic > Small Animal Clinic, Internal Medicine

UniBE Contributor:

Schuller, Simone

Subjects:

600 Technology > 630 Agriculture
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0934-9723

Publisher:

Springer

Language:

English

Submitter:

Simone Schuller

Date Deposited:

10 Oct 2014 10:31

Last Modified:

10 Oct 2014 10:31

Publisher DOI:

10.1007/s10096-010-0991-2

PubMed ID:

20559675

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/59113

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