Long-term relationships among pesticide applications, mobility, and soil erosion in a vineyard watershed

Sabatier, P; Poulenard, J; Fanget, B; Reyss, J.-L.; Develle, A.-L.; Wilhelm, Bruno; Ployon, E; Pignol, C; Naffrechoux, E; Dorioz, J.-M.; Montuelle, B; Arnaud, F (2014). Long-term relationships among pesticide applications, mobility, and soil erosion in a vineyard watershed. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America - PNAS, 111(44), pp. 15647-15652. National Academy of Sciences NAS 10.1073/pnas.1411512111

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Agricultural pesticide use has increased worldwide during the last several decades, but the long-term fate, storage, and transfer dynamics of pesticides in a changing environment are poorly understood. Many pesticides have been progressively banned, but in numerous cases, these molecules are stable and may persist in soils, sediments, and ice. Many studies have addressed the question of their possible remobilization as a result of global change. In this article, we present a retro-observation approach based on lake sediment records to monitor micropollutants and to evaluate the long-term succession and diffuse transfer of herbicides, fungicides, and insecticide treatments in a vineyard catchment in France. The sediment allows for a reliable reconstruction of past pesticide use through time, validated by the historical introduction, use, and banning of these organic and inorganic pesticides in local vineyards. Our results also revealed how changes in these practices affect storage conditions and, consequently, the pesticides’ transfer dynamics. For example, the use of postemergence herbicides (glyphosate), which induce an increase in soil erosion, led to a release of a banned remnant pesticide (dichlorodiphenyltrichloro- ethane, DDT), which had been previously stored in vineyard soil, back into the environment. Management strategies of ecotoxico- logical risk would be well served by recognition of the diversity of compounds stored in various environmental sinks, such as agriculture soil, and their capability to become sources when environmental conditions change.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

08 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geological Sciences
08 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geological Sciences > Quaternary Geology

UniBE Contributor:

Wilhelm, Bruno

Subjects:

500 Science > 550 Earth sciences & geology

ISSN:

0027-8424

Publisher:

National Academy of Sciences NAS

Language:

English

Submitter:

Flavio Anselmetti

Date Deposited:

23 Oct 2014 10:40

Last Modified:

10 Sep 2015 09:02

Publisher DOI:

10.1073/pnas.1411512111

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.59148

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/59148

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