When the systems fail to communicate. Cerebral resting state networks in schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

Razavi, Nadja (2014). When the systems fail to communicate. Cerebral resting state networks in schizophrenia spectrum disorders. (Dissertation, University Hospital of Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatric Neurophysiology)

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There have been numerous attempts to reveal the neurobiological basis of schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Results however, remain as heterogeneous as the schizophrenia spectrum disorders itself. Therefore, one aim of this thesis was to divide patients affected by this disorder into subgroups in order to homogenize the results of future studies. In a first study it is suggested that psychopathological rating scales should focus on symptoms-clusters that may have a common neurophysiological background. The here presented Bern Psychopathology Scale (BPS) proposes that alterations in three wellknown brain systems (motor, language, and affective) are largely leading to the communication failures observable on a behavioral level, but also - as repeatedly hypothesized - to dysconnectivity within and between brain systems in schizophrenia spectrum disorders. The external validity of the motor domain in the BPS was tested against the objective measure of 24 hours wrist actigraphy, in a second study. The subjective, the quantitative, as well as the global rating of the degree of motor disorders in this patient group showed significant correlations to the acquired motor activity. This result confirmed in a first step the practicability of the motor domain of the BPS, but needs further validation regarding pathological brain alterations. Finally, in a third study (independent from the two other studies), two cerebral Resting State Networks frequently altered in schizophrenia were investigated for the first time using simultaneous EEG/fMRI: The well-known default mode network and the left working memory network. Besides the changes in these fMRI-based networks, there are well-documented findings that patients exhibit alterations in EEG spectra compared to healthy controls. However, only through the multimodal approach it was possible to discover that patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders have a slower driving frequency of the Resting State Networks compared to the matched healthy controls. Such a dysfunctional coupling between neuronal frequency and functional brain organization could explain in a uni- or multifactorial way (dysfunctional cross-frequency coupling, maturational effects, vigilance fluctuations, task-related suppression), how the typical psychotic symptoms might occur. To conclude, the major contributions presented in this thesis were on one hand the development of a psychopathology rating scale that is based on the assumption of dysfunctional brain networks, as well as the new evidence of a dysfunctional triggering frequency of Resting State Networks from the simultaneous EEG/fMRI study in patients affected by a schizophrenia spectrum disorder.

Item Type:

Thesis (Dissertation)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Psychiatric Neurophysiology (discontinued)
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy

UniBE Contributor:

Razavi, Nadja and Dierks, Thomas

Subjects:

100 Philosophy > 150 Psychology
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

Language:

English

Submitter:

Nadja Razavi

Date Deposited:

03 Dec 2014 13:42

Last Modified:

07 Jan 2015 10:06

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.60164

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/60164

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