Cerebral High-grade Oligodendroglioma with Sarcomatous Transdifferentiation ("Oligosarcoma") in a Boxer Dog.

Fadda, Angela; Vajtai, Istvan; Lang, Johann; Henke, Diana; Oevermann, Anna (2014). Cerebral High-grade Oligodendroglioma with Sarcomatous Transdifferentiation ("Oligosarcoma") in a Boxer Dog. Journal of veterinary internal medicine, 28(6), pp. 1881-1885. Wiley-Blackwell 10.1111/jvim.12457

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A 9-year-old Boxer dog was referred to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital of the University of Bern for a history of chronic neck pain and gait problems, which rapidly progressed to a non-ambulatory status. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination of the head revealed a large intra-axial space-occupying lesion that was divided in two portions interconnected by a thin isthmus at the level of the cerebellar tentorium. Histopathology revealed a biphasic malignant neoplasm composed of neuroepithelial and mesenchymal elements. The former displayed characteristics of conventional anaplastic oligodendroglioma involving brisk mitotic activity and glomeruloid microvascular proliferation on a background of a fibrillary round cells with "honeycomb-like" perinuclear vacuolation. Conversely, the sarcomatous moiety exhibited haphazard fascicles of spindle cells amidst an intricate mesh of pericellular basal lamina and broad bands of collagen. Both tumor cell populations immunoreacted for Olig-2 and – to a lesser extent – GFAP. In addition, the sarcomatous areas focally expressed vimentin, muscular actin, and smooth muscle actin. "Oligosarcoma" - an exquisitely uncommon pattern of oligodendroglial malignancy in humans - has not previously been reported to affect dogs, although oligodendroglioma is a common CNS tumor in this species. Whether canine oligosarcoma shares with its human counterpart not only morphological aspects, but also molecular signatures, clinical behavior and responsiveness to therapy merits further investigation. In humans, oligodendroglial differentiation tends to confer significant clinical advantage with respect to prognosis and adjuvant treatment options. The awareness of such hallmarks and the investigation of their impact on prognosis are crucial for improved therapeutical strategies in dogs.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Research Foci > NeuroCenter
04 Faculty of Medicine > Service Sector > Institute of Pathology
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > DKV - Clinical Neurology
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV)
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > DKV - Clinical Radiology
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > Small Animal Clinic
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH) > Experimental Clinical Research
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH)

UniBE Contributor:

Fadda, Angela; Vajtai, Istvan; Lang, Johann; Henke, Diana and Oevermann, Anna

Subjects:

500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
500 Science > 590 Animals (Zoology)
600 Technology > 630 Agriculture

ISSN:

0891-6640

Publisher:

Wiley-Blackwell

Language:

English

Submitter:

Angela Fadda

Date Deposited:

24 Dec 2014 11:40

Last Modified:

03 Mar 2015 13:55

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/jvim.12457

PubMed ID:

25410956

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Glial tumors, Primary canine intracranial tumor

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.61251

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/61251

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