Non-naturalized alien plants receive fewer flower visits than naturalized and native plants in a Swiss botanical garden

Razanajatovo, Mialy Harindra; Föhr, Christine; Fischer, Markus; Prati, Daniel; van Kleunen, Mark (2015). Non-naturalized alien plants receive fewer flower visits than naturalized and native plants in a Swiss botanical garden. Biological conservation, 182, pp. 109-116. Elsevier 10.1016/j.biocon.2014.11.043

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Many animal-pollinated plant species have been introduced to non-native regions without their usual pollinators. Nevertheless, some of these alien species managed to establish reproducing naturalized populations, which might negatively affect native plants. Recent studies have shown that many naturalized alien species can readily attract native pollinators. However, it is not known whether alien species that have not established naturalized populations are less successful in attracting pollinators. Therefore, we tested whether flower-visitation rates are lower for non-naturalized aliens than for naturalized alien and native species. We conducted a comparative study on flower visitation of 185 native, 37 naturalized alien and 224 non-naturalized alien plant species in the Botanical Garden of Bern, Switzerland. Our phylogenetically corrected analyses showed that non-naturalized alien species received fewer flower visitors than both naturalized alien and native species. Native, naturalized alien and non-naturalized alien species were visited by similar flower-visitor communities. Furthermore, among the naturalized alien species, the ones with a broader distribution range in Switzerland received a more diverse set of flower visitors. Although it has been suggested that most alien plants can readily integrate into native plant–pollinator networks, we show evidence that the capacity to attract flower visitors in non-native regions is different for naturalized and non-naturalized alien plants. Therefore, we conclude that successful naturalization of alien plants may be related to flower visitation.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Plant Sciences (IPS) > Plant Ecology
08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Plant Sciences (IPS)

UniBE Contributor:

Razanajatovo, Mialy Harindra; Föhr, Christine; Fischer, Markus; Prati, Daniel and van Kleunen, Mark

Subjects:

500 Science > 580 Plants (Botany)

ISSN:

0006-3207

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Peter Alfred von Ballmoos-Haas

Date Deposited:

30 Dec 2014 15:07

Last Modified:

06 Jul 2017 15:10

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.biocon.2014.11.043

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Biological invasions, Botanic garden, Exotic species, Phylogenetic correction, Plant–insect interactions, Pollinator generalization

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.61363

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/61363

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