The effect of surgical titanium rods on proton therapy delivered for cervical bone tumors: experimental validation using an anthropomorphic phantom.

Dietlicher, Isabelle; Casiraghi, Margherita; Ares, Carmen; Bolsi, Alessandra; Weber, Damien Charles; Lomax, Antony J; Albertini, Francesca (2014). The effect of surgical titanium rods on proton therapy delivered for cervical bone tumors: experimental validation using an anthropomorphic phantom. Physics in medicine and biology, 59(23), pp. 7181-7194. Institute of Physics Publishing IOP 10.1088/0031-9155/59/23/7181

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To investigate the effect of metal implants in proton radiotherapy, dose distributions of different, clinically relevant treatment plans have been measured in an anthropomorphic phantom and compared to treatment planning predictions. The anthropomorphic phantom, which is sliced into four segments in the cranio-caudal direction, is composed of tissue equivalent materials and contains a titanium implant in a vertebral body in the cervical region. GafChromic® films were laid between the different segments to measure the 2D delivered dose. Three different four-field plans have then been applied: a Single-Field-Uniform-Dose (SFUD) plan, both with and without artifact correction implemented, and an Intensity-Modulated-Proton-Therapy (IMPT) plan with the artifacts corrected. For corrections, the artifacts were manually outlined and the Hounsfield Units manually set to an average value for soft tissue. Results show a surprisingly good agreement between prescribed and delivered dose distributions when artifacts have been corrected, with > 97% and 98% of points fulfilling the gamma criterion of 3%/3 mm for both SFUD and the IMPT plans, respectively. In contrast, without artifact corrections, up to 18% of measured points fail the gamma criterion of 3%/3 mm for the SFUD plan. These measurements indicate that correcting manually for the reconstruction artifacts resulting from metal implants substantially improves the accuracy of the calculated dose distribution.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Haematology, Oncology, Infectious Diseases, Laboratory Medicine and Hospital Pharmacy (DOLS) > Clinic of Radiation Oncology

UniBE Contributor:

Weber, Damien Charles

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0031-9155

Publisher:

Institute of Physics Publishing IOP

Language:

English

Submitter:

Beatrice Scheidegger

Date Deposited:

10 Mar 2015 15:01

Last Modified:

09 Nov 2015 10:02

Publisher DOI:

10.1088/0031-9155/59/23/7181

PubMed ID:

25369148

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.61598

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/61598

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