Assessment of smoking behaviour in a dental setting: a 1-year follow-up study using self-reported questionnaire data and exhaled carbon monoxide levels.

Engel, Odette; Frei, Marc; Sendi, Pedram; Reichart, Peter; Ramseier, Christoph Andreas; Bornstein, Michael M. (2014). Assessment of smoking behaviour in a dental setting: a 1-year follow-up study using self-reported questionnaire data and exhaled carbon monoxide levels. Clinical oral investigations, 18(3), pp. 909-915. Springer 10.1007/s00784-013-1036-x

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OBJECTIVES

This study analyses the changes in smoking habits over the course of 1 year in a group of patients referred to an oral medicine unit.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Smoking history and behaviour were analysed at baseline and after 1 year based on a self-reported questionnaire and on exhaled carbon monoxide levels [in parts per million (ppm)]. During the initial examination, all smokers underwent tobacco use prevention and cessation counselling.

RESULTS

Of the initial group of 121 patients, 98 were examined at the follow-up visit. At the baseline examination, 33 patients (33.67 %) indicated that they were current smokers. One year later, 14 patients (42.24 % out of the 33 smokers of the initial examination) indicated that they had attempted to stop smoking at least once over the follow-up period and 15.15 % (5 patients) had quit smoking. The mean number of cigarettes smoked per day by current smokers decreased from 13.10 to 12.18 (p = 0.04). The exhaled CO level measurements showed very good correlation with a Spearman's coefficient 0.9880 for the initial visit, and 0.9909 for the follow-up examination. For current smokers, the consumption of one additional cigarette per day elevated the CO measurements by 0.77 ppm (p < 0.0001) at the baseline examination and by 0.84 ppm (p < 0.0001) at the 1-year follow-up.

CONCLUSIONS

In oral health care, where smoking cessation is an important aspect of the treatment strategy, the measurement of exhaled carbon monoxide shows a very good correlation with a self-reported smoking habit.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Measurement of exhaled carbon monoxide is a non-invasive, simple and objective measurement technique for documenting and monitoring smoking cessation and reduction.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > School of Dental Medicine > Department of Oral Surgery and Stomatology
04 Faculty of Medicine > School of Dental Medicine > Department of Periodontology

UniBE Contributor:

Engel, Odette; Reichart, Peter; Ramseier, Christoph Andreas and Bornstein, Michael M.

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1432-6981

Publisher:

Springer

Language:

English

Submitter:

Eveline Carmen Schuler

Date Deposited:

13 Jan 2015 16:36

Last Modified:

25 Jan 2017 12:15

Publisher DOI:

10.1007/s00784-013-1036-x

PubMed ID:

23873321

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Smoking, Self-reported, Exhaled carbon monoxide, Smoking cessation, Dental setting

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.61649

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/61649

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