[Emergency department as final destination: perception and reception of the palliative patient" concept as well as approach toward improving interdisciplinary collaboration - a survey of emergency personnel of a Swiss emergency department]

Stähli Klenk, Laurence; Iucolano, Nicoletta Milena; Braun, Christian Tasso; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis; Eychmüller, Steffen (2014). [Emergency department as final destination: perception and reception of the palliative patient" concept as well as approach toward improving interdisciplinary collaboration - a survey of emergency personnel of a Swiss emergency department]. Praxis - schweizerische Rundschau für Medizin, 104(1), pp. 19-25. Huber 10.1024/1661-8157/a001884

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Background: As the demand for palliative care (PC) in emergency wards continues to increase, emergency medicine is increasingly focusing on the care of extremely ill patients with incurable, chronic and/or advanced diseases. There is no consistent definition of the profile of PC or understanding of what PC involves. The mistake is often made of confusing PC with end-of-life or terminal care. The present study was intended to assess the situation at the Department of Emergency Medicine, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital (UNZ), which cares for about 32 400 patients annually. The plan was to find out how much staff members knew about PC and to survey their personal attitudes. Methods: The employees of the UNZ were surveyed with an online questionnaire by a special institution outside the hospital. This is based on an instrument [1] developed in a comparative study in an emergency ward in the USA and used for physicians. Results: 60 of 154 staff members (physicians and nurses) completed the questionnaire, corresponding to a response rate of 39%. The definition of palliative care (n=60) was very mixed and could be classified into 6 areas. In response to questions about specific services, the staff members mentioned that their access to existing patient data should be facilitated. They also expressed the wish for a 24 h palliative consultation service and thought that, during normal working days, more time should be allotted to discussing issues related to palliative care. Conclusions: It has been confirmed that the definition of palliative care is not consistent. Within the UNZ, there is no clear procedure, but lack of time for detailed discussions with patients needing palliative care. Patient wishes or living wills with the DNR/DNI procedure do not contradict the personal ethics of most staff members. UNZ staff members would welcome the 24 h availability of a specialized PC team, as well as the development of guidelines and increased training in PC.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of General Internal Medicine (DAIM) > Clinic of General Internal Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Intensive Care, Emergency Medicine and Anaesthesiology (DINA) > University Emergency Center
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Haematology, Oncology, Infectious Diseases, Laboratory Medicine and Hospital Pharmacy (DOLS) > Clinic of Medical Oncology

UniBE Contributor:

Stähli Klenk, Laurence; Iucolano, Nicoletta Milena; Braun, Christian Tasso; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis and Eychmüller, Steffen

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1661-8157

Publisher:

Huber

Language:

German

Submitter:

Marianne Zahn

Date Deposited:

19 Feb 2015 11:08

Last Modified:

18 Apr 2016 16:09

Publisher DOI:

10.1024/1661-8157/a001884

PubMed ID:

25552443

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.63203

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/63203

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