Meta-Analysis of Long-Term Land Management Effect on Soil Organic Carbon (SOC) in Ethiopia

Shiferaw, Abebe; Hergarten, Christian; Kassawmar, Tibebu; Zeleke, Gete (2014). Meta-Analysis of Long-Term Land Management Effect on Soil Organic Carbon (SOC) in Ethiopia. International Journal of Agricultural Research, 10(1), pp. 1-13. Academic Journals, New York 10.3923/ijar.2015.1.13

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The role of Soil Organic Carbon (SOC) in mitigating climate change, indicating soil quality and ecosystem function has created research interested to know the nature of SOC at landscape level. The objective of this study was to examine variation and distribution of SOC in a long-term land management at a watershed and plot level. This study was based on meta-analysis of three case studies and 128 surface soil samples from Ethiopia. Three sites (Gununo, Anjeni and Maybar) were compared after considering two Land Management Categories (LMC) and three types of land uses (LUT) in quasi-experimental design. Shapiro-Wilk tests showed non-normal distribution (p = 0.002, a = 0.05) of the data. SOC median value showed the effect of long-term land management with values of 2.29 and 2.38 g kg-1 for less and better-managed watersheds, respectively. SOC values were 1.7, 2.8 and 2.6 g kg-1 for Crop (CLU), Grass (GLU) and Forest Land Use (FLU), respectively. The rank order for SOC variability was FLU>GLU>CLU. Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis test showed a significant difference in the medians and distribution of SOC among the LUT, between soil profiles (p<0.05, confidence interval 95%, a = 0.05) while it is not significant (p>0.05) for LMC. The mean and sum rank of Mann Whitney U and Kruskal Wallis test also showed the difference at watershed and plot level. Using SOC as a predictor, cross-validated correct classification with discriminant analysis showed 46 and 49% for LUT and LMC, respectively. The study showed how to categorize landscapes using SOC with respect to land management for decision-makers.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

10 Strategic Research Centers > Centre for Development and Environment (CDE)

Graduate School:

International Graduate School North-South (IGS North-South)

UniBE Contributor:

Hergarten, Christian

ISSN:

1816-4897

Publisher:

Academic Journals, New York

Language:

English

Submitter:

Stephan Schmidt

Date Deposited:

17 Mar 2015 10:55

Last Modified:

10 Sep 2017 09:41

Publisher DOI:

10.3923/ijar.2015.1.13

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.63782

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/63782

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