Declining transition rates to psychosis: The role of diagnostic spectra and symptom overlaps in individuals with attenuated psychosis syndrome

Simon, Andor; Umbricht, Daniel; Lang, Undine E.; Borgwardt, Stefan (2014). Declining transition rates to psychosis: The role of diagnostic spectra and symptom overlaps in individuals with attenuated psychosis syndrome. Schizophrenia Research, 159(2-3), pp. 292-298. Elsevier 10.1016/j.schres.2014.09.016

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Transition to psychosis in at-risk individuals has markedly declined in recent years. So far it has never been discussed in detail that with the growing awareness and increasing availability of early psychosis services, a much broader diagnostic spectrum is now being seen in these services. Subsequently, subjects present with symptoms that meet psychosis risk on a purely psychometric basis but may be the phenotypical expression of another underlying mental disorder. Here we critically review four groups of symptoms and clinical features that are frequently reported by individuals with suspected psychosis risk states, yet share strong commonalities with other mental disorders and conditions: isolated hallucinations; unusual bodily perceptions, hypochondriatic fears and cenesthetic psychotic symptoms; depersonalization; obsessive–compulsive, overvalued and delusional ideas. Of the 616 individuals so far assessed in the Bruderholz Early Psychosis Outpatient Service for Adolescents and Young Adults, 218 (30.5%) met ultra-high risk (UHR) criteria, 188 (86.2%) of whom suffered from one of the four above-mentioned symptom groups. The appraisal of the diagnostic spectra and their overlapping symptoms constitute a tremendous challenge in the clinical assessment of each referred individual. The final conclusion of a clinical assessment should not end with the mere assignment – or non-assignment – to a presumed psychosis risk group, but needs to take into account the ‘Gestalt’ of these particular symptoms and clinical features and thus be based on many more facets than solely a psychometric or nosological approach. Such an approach may break down the heterogeneous psychosis risk group and enable appropriate treatment regimes.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Review Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Psychiatric Neurophysiology (discontinued)
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Management
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services

UniBE Contributor:

Simon, Andor

Subjects:

100 Philosophy > 150 Psychology
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0920-9964

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Lilo Badertscher

Date Deposited:

03 Mar 2015 16:50

Last Modified:

15 Dec 2015 09:14

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.schres.2014.09.016

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.64007

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/64007

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