Recommendations for sex/gender neuroimaging research: Key principles and implications for research design, analysis and interpretation

Rippon, Gina; Jordan-Young, Rebecca; Kaiser, Anelis; Fine, Cordelia (2014). Recommendations for sex/gender neuroimaging research: Key principles and implications for research design, analysis and interpretation. Frontiers in human neuroscience, 8(Art. 650), pp. 1-13. Frontiers Research Foundation 10.3389/fnhum.2014.00650

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Neuroimaging (NI) technologies are having increasing impact in the study of complex cognitive and social processes. In this emerging field of social cognitive neuroscience, a central goal should be to increase the understanding of the interaction between the neurobiology of the individual and the environment in which humans develop and function. The study of sex/gender is often a focus for NI research, and may be motivated by a desire to better understand general developmental principles, mental health problems that show female-male disparities, and gendered differences in society. In order to ensure the maximum possible contribution of NI research to these goals, we draw attention to four key principles—overlap, mosaicism, contingency and entanglement—that have emerged from sex/gender research and that should inform NI research design, analysis and interpretation. We discuss the implications of these principles in the form of constructive guidelines and suggestions for researchers, editors, reviewers and science communicators.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology > Social Psychology and Social Neuroscience

UniBE Contributor:

Kaiser Trujillo, Anelis Carolina

Subjects:

300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology

ISSN:

1662-5161

Publisher:

Frontiers Research Foundation

Language:

English

Submitter:

Anelis Carolina Kaiser Trujillo

Date Deposited:

13 Mar 2015 11:11

Last Modified:

14 Mar 2015 08:31

Publisher DOI:

10.3389/fnhum.2014.00650

Uncontrolled Keywords:

brain imaging, sex differences, sex similarities, gender, stereotypes, essentialism, plasticity

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.64417

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/64417

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