Gender, Professional Networks, and Subjective Career Success within Early Academic Science Careers: The Role of Gender Composition in Inside and Outside Departmental Support Networks

Spurk, Daniel; Meinecke, Annika L.; Kauffeld, Simone; Volmer, Judith (2015). Gender, Professional Networks, and Subjective Career Success within Early Academic Science Careers: The Role of Gender Composition in Inside and Outside Departmental Support Networks. Journal of personnel psychology, 14(3), pp. 121-130. Hogrefe 10.1027/1866-5888/a000131

[img] Text
Spurk et al Gender Professional Networks and Subjective Career Success JPPSY in press.pdf - Accepted Version
Restricted to registered users only
Available under License Publisher holds Copyright.

Download (471kB) | Request a copy

The present study analyzed (a) gender differences in the gender composition (i.e., the proportion of male to female contacts) of professional support networks inside and outside an individual’s academic department and (b) how these differences in gender composition relate to subjective career success (i.e., perceived career success and perceived external marketability). Results showed that the networks’ gender composition is associated with subjective career success. Men’s networks consist of a higher proportion of male to female supporters, which, in turn, was positively related to subjective career success. Additional analyses revealed that the findings could not be accounted for by alternative factors, such as network size, networking behaviors, and career ambition.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology > Work and Organisational Psychology

UniBE Contributor:

Spurk, Daniel

Subjects:

100 Philosophy > 150 Psychology

ISSN:

1866-5888

Publisher:

Hogrefe

Language:

English

Submitter:

Daniel Michael Spurk

Date Deposited:

25 Mar 2015 13:42

Last Modified:

21 Oct 2018 01:52

Publisher DOI:

10.1027/1866-5888/a000131

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.65726

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/65726

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback