Ascending thoracic aorta dimension and outcomes in acute type B dissection (from the International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissection [IRAD])

Booher, Anna M; Isselbacher, Eric M; Nienaber, Christoph A; Froehlich, James B; Trimarchi, Santi; Cooper, Jeanna V; Demertzis, Stefanos; Ramanath, Vijay S; Januzzi, James L; Harris, Kevin M; O'Gara, Patrick T; Sundt, Thoralf M; Pyeritz, Reed E; Eagle, Kim A; International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissection (IRAD) Investi, (2011). Ascending thoracic aorta dimension and outcomes in acute type B dissection (from the International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissection [IRAD]). American journal of cardiology, 107(2), pp. 315-20. New York, N.Y.: Elsevier 10.1016/j.amjcard.2010.09.020

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It is not well known if the size of the ascending thoracic aorta at presentation predicts features of presentation, management, and outcomes in patients with acute type B aortic dissection. The International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissection (IRAD) database was queried for all patients with acute type B dissection who had documentation of ascending thoracic aortic size at time of presentation. Patients were categorized according to ascending thoracic aortic diameters ≤4.0, 4.1 to 4.5, and ≥4.6 cm. Four hundred eighteen patients met inclusion criteria; 291 patients (69.6%) were men with a mean age of 63.2 ± 13.5 years. Ascending thoracic aortic diameter ≤4.0 cm was noted in 250 patients (59.8%), 4.1 to 4.5 cm in 105 patients (25.1%), and ≥4.6 cm in 63 patients (15.1%). Patients with an ascending thoracic aortic diameter ≥4.6 cm were more likely to be men (p = 0.01) and have Marfan syndrome (p <0.001) and known bicuspid aortic valve disease (p = 0.003). In patients with an ascending thoracic aorta ≥4.1 cm, there was an increased incidence of surgical intervention (p = 0.013). In those with an ascending thoracic aorta ≥4.6 cm, the root, ascending aorta, arch, and aortic valve were more often involved in surgical repair. Patients with an ascending thoracic aorta ≤4.0 were more likely to have endovascular therapy than those with larger ascending thoracic aortas (p = 0.009). There was no difference in overall mortality or cause of death. In conclusion, ascending thoracic aortic enlargement in patients with acute type B aortic dissection is common. Although its presence does not appear to predict an increased risk of mortality, it is associated with more frequent open surgical intervention that often involves replacement of the proximal aorta. Those with smaller proximal aortas are more likely to receive endovascular therapy.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Cardiovascular Disorders (DHGE) > Clinic of Cardiovascular Surgery

UniBE Contributor:

Demertzis, Stefanos

ISSN:

0002-9149

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:20

Last Modified:

17 Mar 2015 19:27

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.amjcard.2010.09.020

PubMed ID:

21211610

Web of Science ID:

000286789200028

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/6642 (FactScience: 211640)

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