Development of a specific tracer for metabolic imaging of alveolar echinococcosis: A preclinical study

Porot, Clémence; Knapp, Jenny; Wang, Junhua; Germain, Stéphane; Camporese, Davide; Seimbille, Yann; Boulahdour, Hatem; Vuitton, Dominique A; Gottstein, Bruno; Blagosklonov, Oleg (2014). Development of a specific tracer for metabolic imaging of alveolar echinococcosis: A preclinical study. IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society conference proceedings, 2014, pp. 5587-5590. IEEE Service Center 10.1109/EMBC.2014.6944893

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Positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) using [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) (FDG-PET/CT) is a valuable method for initial staging and follow up of patients with alveolar echinococcosis (AE). However, the cells responsible for FDG uptake have not been clearly identified. The main goal of our study was to evaluate the uptake of PET tracers by the cells involved in the host-parasite reaction around AE lesions as the first step to develop a specific PET tracer that would allow direct assessment of parasite viability in AE. Candidate molecules ([18F]-fluorotyrosine (FET), [18F]-fluorothymidine (FLT), and [18F]-fluorometylcholine (FMC), were compared to FDG by in vitro studies on human leukocytes and parasite vesicles. Our results confirmed that FDG was mainly consumed by immune cells and showed that FLT was the best candidate tracer for parasite metabolism. Indeed, parasite cells exhibited high uptake of FLT. We also performed PET/CT scans in mice infected intraperitoneally with E. multilocularis metacestodes. PET images showed no FDG or FLT uptake in parasitic lesions. This preliminary study assessed the metabolic activity of human leukocytes and AE cells using radiolabeling. Future studies could develop a specific PET tracer for AE lesions to improve lesion detection and echinococcosis treatment in patients. Our results demonstrated that a new animal model is needed for preclinical PET imaging to better mimic human hepatic and/or periparasitic metabolism.

Item Type:

Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP) > Institute of Parasitology
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP)

UniBE Contributor:

Wang, Junhua and Gottstein, Bruno

Subjects:

600 Technology > 630 Agriculture
500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology

ISSN:

1557-170X

Publisher:

IEEE Service Center

Language:

English

Submitter:

Bruno Gottstein

Date Deposited:

14 Apr 2015 16:10

Last Modified:

14 Apr 2015 16:11

Publisher DOI:

10.1109/EMBC.2014.6944893

PubMed ID:

25571261

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.66716

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/66716

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