General distress, hopelessness—suicidal ideation and worrying in adolescence: Concurrent and predictive validity of a symptom-level bifactor model for clinical diagnoses

Brodbeck, Jeannette; Goodyer, I.M.; Abbott, R.A.; Dunn, V.J.; St Clair, M.C.; Owens, M.; Jones, P.B.; Croudace, T.J. (2014). General distress, hopelessness—suicidal ideation and worrying in adolescence: Concurrent and predictive validity of a symptom-level bifactor model for clinical diagnoses. Journal of Affective Disorders, 152-154, pp. 299-305. Elsevier 10.1016/j.jad.2013.09.029

[img]
Preview
Text
1-s2.0-S0165032713007155-main.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons: Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works (CC-BY-NC-ND).

Download (454kB) | Preview

BACKGROUND: Clinical disorders often share common symptoms and aetiological factors. Bifactor models acknowledge the role of an underlying general distress component and more specific sub-domains of psychopathology which specify the unique components of disorders over and above a general factor. METHODS: A bifactor model jointly calibrated data on subjective distress from The Mood and Feelings Questionnaire and the Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale. The bifactor model encompassed a general distress factor, and specific factors for (a) hopelessness-suicidal ideation, (b) generalised worrying and (c) restlessness-fatigue at age 14 which were related to lifetime clinical diagnoses established by interviews at ages 14 (concurrent validity) and current diagnoses at 17 years (predictive validity) in a British population sample of 1159 adolescents. RESULTS: Diagnostic interviews confirmed the validity of a symptom-level bifactor model. The underlying general distress factor was a powerful but non-specific predictor of affective, anxiety and behaviour disorders. The specific factors for hopelessness-suicidal ideation and generalised worrying contributed to predictive specificity. Hopelessness-suicidal ideation predicted concurrent and future affective disorder; generalised worrying predicted concurrent and future anxiety, specifically concurrent generalised anxiety disorders. Generalised worrying was negatively associated with behaviour disorders. LIMITATIONS: The analyses of gender differences and the prediction of specific disorders was limited due to a low frequency of disorders other than depression. CONCLUSIONS: The bifactor model was able to differentiate concurrent and predict future clinical diagnoses. This can inform the development of targeted as well as non-specific interventions for prevention and treatment of different disorders.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology > Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy
07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology

UniBE Contributor:

Brodbeck, Jeannette

Subjects:

100 Philosophy > 150 Psychology

ISSN:

0165-0327

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Adriana Biaggi

Date Deposited:

08 Jun 2015 14:48

Last Modified:

13 Jun 2015 16:34

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.jad.2013.09.029

PubMed ID:

24238952

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.66839

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/66839

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback