The Efficacy of a Novel Microbial 6-Phytase Expressed in Aspergillus oryzae on the Performance and Phosphorus Utilization of Cold- and Warm-Water Fish: Rainbow Trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss , and Nile Tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus

Verlhac-Trichet, Viviane; Vielma, Jouni; Dias, Jorge; Rema, Paulo; Santigosa, Ester; Wahli, Thomas; Vogel, Kurt (2014). The Efficacy of a Novel Microbial 6-Phytase Expressed in Aspergillus oryzae on the Performance and Phosphorus Utilization of Cold- and Warm-Water Fish: Rainbow Trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss , and Nile Tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus. Journal of the World Aquaculture Society, 45(4), pp. 367-379. 10.1111/jwas.12133

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The efficacy and tolerance of a novel microbial 6-phytase were investigated in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, and Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus. Reference diets were sufficient in available phosphorus (P). The test diet limiting in available P was supplemented with phytase at 500, 1000, or 2000 phytase units/kg feed. The enzyme was effective in increasing total P apparent digestibility coefficient in relation to increasing the dose of phytase in rainbow trout and Nile tilapia. Zinc apparent digestibility improved in relation to phytase supplementation in rainbow trout. P release due to phytase supplementation ranged from 0.06 to 0.18% P/kg feed in rainbow trout and from 0.13 to 0.26% P/kg feed in Nile tilapia. A 58-d performance trial was conducted to evaluate tolerance of fish to phytase supplementation. Dietary treatments consisted of a basal diet without phytase or supplemented with 2000 and 200,000 phytase units/kg feed. Results indicate that this novel microbial 6-phytase is well tolerated by fish. Significant improvements for growth as well as feed conversion ratio were observed when the phytase was fed at 2000 phytase units/kg feed. This phytase is proven efficient in releasing P from phytate and could be added when plants are used for fish meal replacement in diets for salmonid and omnivorous fish.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP)
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP) > Center for Fish and Wildlife Health (FIWI)

UniBE Contributor:

Wahli, Thomas

Subjects:

600 Technology > 630 Agriculture

ISSN:

0893-8849

Language:

English

Submitter:

Lucia Gugger-Raaflaub

Date Deposited:

23 Apr 2015 12:39

Last Modified:

12 Oct 2015 15:30

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/jwas.12133

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.66990

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/66990

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