Tracing the Evidence: The Use of Evaluation Results in Direct-Democratic Campaigns

Stucki, Iris; Schlaufer, Caroline (June 2013). Tracing the Evidence: The Use of Evaluation Results in Direct-Democratic Campaigns (Unpublished). In: International Conference on Public Policy ICPP. Genoble. 26.-28.06.2013.

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Although research on direct-democratic campaigns in Switzerland has intensified in the last decade, detailed information on the use of evidence in campaigns is still lacking. Our research aims to contribute both to research on direct democracy and to research on evidence-based policy making, by analyzing how evaluation results are used in directdemocratic campaigns. In this conceptual paper, the formulation of our hypothesis is based on a model of evaluation influence that traces the different uses of evaluation results in the process of a direct-democratic campaign. We assume that the policy analytical capacity of individual members in parliament, government and administration in the (pre)-parliamentary process fosters the use of evidence in campaigns. In the course of the campaign, symbolic use of evaluation in the form of justification, persuasion or mobilization prevails. We assume that the media is an important player in making transparent how political actors use evidence to support their positions. Evidence itself often remains ambiguous and uncertain, and evaluations are influenced by the values of the evaluator. To be able to make the right decisions, therefore, citizens should learn about possible interpretations in argumentative processes. For us, the context of direct democracy in Switzerland provides the setting for such a discourse that, besides evidence, brings up different opinions, values and beliefs.

Item Type:

Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Division/Institute:

11 Centers of Competence > Center of Comptetence for Public Management (KPM)

UniBE Contributor:

Stucki, Iris and Schlaufer, Caroline

Subjects:

300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology > 350 Public administration & military science

Language:

English

Submitter:

Caroline Lea Schlaufer

Date Deposited:

27 Apr 2015 15:31

Last Modified:

27 Apr 2015 15:31

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/67329

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