Sulfate and Nitrate Assimilation in Leaves of Quercus ilex and Quercus pubescens Grown Near Natural CO2 Springs in Central Italy

Herschbach, Cornelia; Schulte, Monika; von Ballmoos, Peter; Brunold, Christian; Rennenberg, Heinz (2012). Sulfate and Nitrate Assimilation in Leaves of Quercus ilex and Quercus pubescens Grown Near Natural CO2 Springs in Central Italy. In: De Kok, Luit J.; Tabe, Linda; Tausz, Michael; Hawkesford, Malcolm J.; Hoefgen, Rainer; McManus, Michael T.; Norton, Robert M.; Rennenberg, Heinz; Saito, Kazuki; Schnug, Ewald (eds.) Sulfur Metabolism in Plants. Proceedings of the International Plant Sulfur Workshop: Vol. 1 (pp. 237-248). Amsterdam: Springer Netherlands 10.1007/978-94-007-4450-9_29

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The effect of long-term exposure to elevated pCO2 concentrations on sulfate and nitrate assimilation was studied under field conditions using leaves from Quercus ilex and Quercus pubescens trees growing with ambient or elevated CO2 concentrations in the vicinity of three natural CO2 springs, Bossoleto, Laiatico and Sulfatara, in Tuscany, Italy. The activity of the key enzymes of sulfate assimilation, adenosine 5′-phosphosulfate reductase (APR) and nitrate assimilation, nitrate reductase (NR), were measured together with the levels of acid soluble thiols, and soluble non-proteinogenic nitrogen compounds. Whereas NR activity remained unaffected in Q. ilex or increased Q. pubescence, APR activity decreased in the area of CO2 springs. The latter changes were often accompanied by increased GSH concentrations, apparently synthesized from H2S and SO2 present in the gas mixture emitted from the CO2 springs. Thus, the diminished APR activity in leaves of Q. ilex and Q. pubescence from spring areas can best be explained by the exposure to gaseous sulfur compounds. Although the concentrations of H2S and SO2 in the gas mixture emitted from the vents at the CO2 springs were low at the Bossoleto and Laiatico spring, these sulfur gases pose physiological effects, which may override consequences of elevated pCO2.

Item Type:

Book Section (Book Chapter)

Division/Institute:

08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Plant Sciences (IPS) > Stress Physiology (discontinued)
08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Plant Sciences (IPS)

UniBE Contributor:

von Ballmoos, Peter and Brunold, Christian

Subjects:

500 Science > 580 Plants (Botany)

ISBN:

978-94-007-4449-3

Series:

Proceedings of the International Plant Sulfur Workshop

Publisher:

Springer Netherlands

Language:

English

Submitter:

Peter Alfred von Ballmoos-Haas

Date Deposited:

21 May 2015 13:32

Last Modified:

14 Nov 2017 16:17

Publisher DOI:

10.1007/978-94-007-4450-9_29

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.68810

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/68810

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