The maize lipoxygenase, ZmLOX10 , mediates green leaf volatile, jasmonate and herbivore-induced plant volatile production for defense against insect attack

Christensen, Shawn A.; Nemchenko, Andriy; Borrego, Eli; Murray, Ian; Sobhy, Islam S.; Bosak, Liz; DeBlasio, Stacy; Erb, Matthias; Robert, Christelle A. M.; Vaughn, Kathy A.; Herrfurth, Cornelia; Tumlinson, Jim; Feussner, Ivo; Jackson, David; Turlings, Ted C.J.; Engelberth, Jurgen; Nansen, Christian; Meeley, Robert; Kolomiets, Michael V. (2013). The maize lipoxygenase, ZmLOX10 , mediates green leaf volatile, jasmonate and herbivore-induced plant volatile production for defense against insect attack. The Plant Journal, 74(1), pp. 59-73. Blackwell Science 10.1111/tpj.12101

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Fatty acid derivatives are of central importance for plant immunity against insect herbivores; however, majorregulatory genes and the signals that modulate these defense metabolites are vastly understudied, especiallyin important agro-economic monocot species. Here we show that products and signals derived from a singleZea mays (maize) lipoxygenase (LOX), ZmLOX10, are critical for both direct and indirect defenses to herbiv-ory. We provide genetic evidence that two 13-LOXs, ZmLOX10 and ZmLOX8, specialize in providing substratefor the green leaf volatile (GLV) and jasmonate (JA) biosynthesis pathways, respectively. Supporting the spe-cialization of these LOX isoforms, LOX8 and LOX10 are localized to two distinct cellular compartments, indi-cating that the JA and GLV biosynthesis pathways are physically separated in maize. Reduced expression ofJA biosynthesis genes and diminished levels of JA in lox10 mutants indicate that LOX10-derived signaling isrequired for LOX8-mediated JA. The possible role of GLVs in JA signaling is supported by their ability to par-tially restore wound-induced JA levels in lox10 mutants. The impaired ability of lox10 mutants to produceGLVs and JA led to dramatic reductions in herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs) and attractiveness toparasitoid wasps. Because LOX10 is under circadian rhythm regulation, this study provides a mechanistic linkto the diurnal regulation of GLVs and HIPVs. GLV-, JA- and HIPV-deficient lox10 mutants display compro-mised resistance to insect feeding, both under laboratory and field conditions, which is strong evidence thatLOX10-dependent metabolites confer immunity against insect attack. Hence, this comprehensive gene toagro-ecosystem study reveals the broad implications of a single LOX isoform in herbivore defense.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Plant Sciences (IPS)
08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Plant Sciences (IPS) > Biotic Interactions

UniBE Contributor:

Erb, Matthias and Robert, Christelle Aurélie Maud

Subjects:

500 Science > 580 Plants (Botany)

ISSN:

0960-7412

Publisher:

Blackwell Science

Language:

English

Submitter:

Peter Alfred von Ballmoos-Haas

Date Deposited:

10 Jul 2015 07:50

Last Modified:

28 Feb 2018 10:44

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/tpj.12101

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Zea mays; lipoxygenase; green leaf volatiles; jasmonic acid; herbivore-induced plant volatiles; herbivore resistance

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.70154

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/70154

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