Contemporary ecotypic divergence during a recent range expansion was facilitated by adaptive introgression

Lucek, Kay Jurka Olaf; Lemoine, Mélissa; Seehausen, Ole (2014). Contemporary ecotypic divergence during a recent range expansion was facilitated by adaptive introgression. Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 27(10), pp. 2233-2248. Wiley 10.1111/jeb.12475

[img] Text
Lucek_et_al-2014-Journal_of_Evolutionary_Biology.pdf - Published Version
Restricted to registered users only
Available under License Publisher holds Copyright.

Download (1MB) | Request a copy

Although rapid phenotypic evolution during range expansion associated with colonization of contrasting habitats has been documented in several taxa, the evolutionary mechanisms that underlie such phenotypic divergence have less often been investigated. A strong candidate for rapid ecotype formation within an invaded range is the three-spine stickleback in the Lake Geneva region of central Europe. Since its introduction only about 140 years ago, it has undergone a significant expansion of its range and its niche, now forming phenotypically differentiated parapatric ecotypes that occupy either the pelagic zone of the large lake or small inlet streams, respectively. By comparing museum collections from different times with contemporary population samples, we here reconstruct the evolution of parapatric phenotypic divergence through time. Using genetic data from modern samples, we infer the underlying invasion history. We find that parapatric habitat-dependent phenotypic divergence between the lake and stream was already present in the first half of the twentieth century, but the magnitude of differentiation increased through time, particularly in antipredator defence traits. This suggests that divergent selection between the habitats occurred and was stable through much of the time since colonization. Recently, increased phenotypic differentiation in antipredator defence traits likely results from habitat-dependent selection on alleles that arrived through introgression from a distantly related lineage from outside the Lake Geneva region. This illustrates how hybridization can quickly promote phenotypic divergence in a system where adaptation from standing genetic variation was constrained.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Ecology and Evolution (IEE)
08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Ecology and Evolution (IEE) > Aquatic Ecology

UniBE Contributor:

Lucek, Kay Jurka Olaf; Lemoine, Mélissa and Seehausen, Ole

Subjects:

500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology

ISSN:

1010-061X

Publisher:

Wiley

Language:

English

Submitter:

Marcel Häsler

Date Deposited:

21 Jul 2015 07:55

Last Modified:

08 Sep 2015 09:57

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/jeb.12475

PubMed ID:

25228272

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.70367

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/70367

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback