Carbon-11 Reveals Opposing Roles of Auxin and Salicylic Acid in Regulating Leaf Physiology, Leaf Metabolism, and Resource Allocation Patterns that Impact Root Growth in Zea mays

Agtuca, Beverly; Rieger, Elisabeth; Hilger, Katharina; Song, Lihui; Robert, Christelle A. M.; Erb, Matthias; Karve, Abhijit; Ferrieri, Richard A. (2014). Carbon-11 Reveals Opposing Roles of Auxin and Salicylic Acid in Regulating Leaf Physiology, Leaf Metabolism, and Resource Allocation Patterns that Impact Root Growth in Zea mays. Journal of Plant Growth Regulation, 33(2), pp. 328-339. Springer 10.1007/s00344-013-9379-8

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Auxin (IAA) is an important regulator of plant development and root differentiation. Although recent studies indicate that salicylic acid (SA) may also be important in this context by interfering with IAA signaling, comparatively little is known about its impact on the plant’s physiology, metabolism, and growth characteristics. Using carbon-11, a short-lived radioisotope (t 1/2 = 20.4 min) administered as 11CO2 to maize plants (B73), we measured changes in these functions using SA and IAA treatments. IAA application decreased total root biomass, though it increased lateral root growth at the expense of primary root elongation. IAA-mediated inhibition of root growth was correlated with decreased 11CO2 fixation, photosystem II (PSII) efficiency, and total leaf carbon export of 11C-photoassimilates and their allocation belowground. Furthermore, IAA application increased leaf starch content. On the other hand, SA application increased total root biomass, 11CO2 fixation, PSII efficiency, and leaf carbon export of 11C-photoassimilates, but it decreased leaf starch content. IAA and SA induction patterns were also examined after root-herbivore attack by Diabrotica virgifera to place possible hormone crosstalk into a realistic environmental context. We found that 4 days after infestation, IAA was induced in the midzone and root tip, whereas SA was induced only in the upper proximal zone of damaged roots. We conclude that antagonistic crosstalk exists between IAA and SA which can affect the development of maize plants, particularly through alteration of the root system’s architecture, and we propose that the integration of both signals may shape the plant’s response to environmental stress.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Plant Sciences (IPS) > Biotic Interactions
08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Plant Sciences (IPS)

UniBE Contributor:

Erb, Matthias

Subjects:

500 Science > 580 Plants (Botany)

ISSN:

0721-7595

Publisher:

Springer

Language:

English

Submitter:

Peter Alfred von Ballmoos-Haas

Date Deposited:

03 Aug 2015 11:56

Last Modified:

08 Sep 2015 11:34

Publisher DOI:

10.1007/s00344-013-9379-8

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Carbon-11; PET imaging; Auxin; Salicylic acid; Hormone crosstalk; Root–herbivore interactions

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.70659

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/70659

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