Darwin's multicellularity: from neurotrophic theories and cell competition to fitness fingerprints

Moreno, Eduardo; Rhiner, Christa (2014). Darwin's multicellularity: from neurotrophic theories and cell competition to fitness fingerprints. Current opinion in cell biology, 31, pp. 16-22. Elsevier 10.1016/j.ceb.2014.06.011

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Metazoans have evolved ways to engage only the most appropriate cells for long-term tissue development and homeostasis. In many cases, competitive interactions have been shown to guide such cell selection events. In Drosophila, a process termed cell competition eliminates slow proliferating cells from growing epithelia. Recent studies show that cell competition is conserved in mammals with crucial functions like the elimination of suboptimal stem cells from the early embryo and the replacement of old T-cell progenitors in the thymus to prevent tumor formation. Moreover, new data in Drosophila has revealed that fitness indicator proteins, required for cell competition, are also involved in the culling of retinal neurons suggesting that 'fitness fingerprints' may play a general role in cell selection.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Cell Biology

UniBE Contributor:

Moreno, Eduardo and Rhiner, Christa

Subjects:

500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology
500 Science

ISSN:

0955-0674

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Volker Heussler

Date Deposited:

14 Aug 2015 12:19

Last Modified:

15 Aug 2015 05:15

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.ceb.2014.06.011

PubMed ID:

25022356

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.71023

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/71023

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