Late Quaternary history of North Eurasian Norway spruce ( Picea abies ) and Siberian spruce ( Picea obovata ) inferred from macrofossils, pollen and cytoplasmic DNA variation

Tollefsrud, Mari Mette; Latałowa, Małgorzata; van der Knaap, Willem Oscar; Brochmann, Christian; Sperisen, Christoph (2015). Late Quaternary history of North Eurasian Norway spruce ( Picea abies ) and Siberian spruce ( Picea obovata ) inferred from macrofossils, pollen and cytoplasmic DNA variation. Journal of Biogeography, 42(8), pp. 1431-1442. Wiley 10.1111/jbi.12484

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Aim
We used combined palaeobotanical and genetic data to assess whether Norway spruce (Picea abies) and Siberian spruce (Picea obovata), two major components of the Eurasian boreal forests, occupied separate glacial refugia, and to test previous hypotheses on their distinction, geographical delimitation and introgression.

Location
The range of Norway spruce in northern Europe and Siberian spruce in northern Asia.

Methods
Pollen data and recently compiled macrofossil records were summarized for the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), late glacial and Holocene. Genetic variation was assessed in 50 populations using one maternally (mitochondrial nad1) and one paternally (chloroplast trnT–trnL) inherited marker and analysed using spatial analyses of molecular variance (SAMOVA).

Results
Macrofossils showed that spruce was present in both northern Europe and Siberia at the LGM. Congruent macrofossil and pollen data from the late glacial suggested widespread expansions of spruce in the East European Plain, West Siberian Plain, southern Siberian mountains and the Baikal region. Colonization was largely completed during the early Holocene, except in the formerly glaciated area of northern Europe. Both DNA markers distinguished two highly differentiated groups that correspond to Norway spruce and Siberian spruce and coincide spatially with separate LGM spruce occurrences. The division of the mtDNA variation was geographically well defined and occurred to the east of the Ural Mountains along the Ob River, whereas the cpDNA variation showed widespread admixture. Genetic diversity of both DNA markers was higher in western than in eastern populations.

Main conclusions
North Eurasian Norway spruce and Siberian spruce are genetically distinct and occupied separate LGM refugia, Norway spruce on the East European Plain and Siberian spruce in southern Siberia, where they were already widespread during the late glacial. They came into contact in the basin of the Ob River and probably hybridized. The lower genetic diversity in the eastern populations may indicate that Siberian spruce suffered more from past climatic fluctuations than Norway spruce.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

10 Strategic Research Centers > Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research (OCCR)
08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Plant Sciences (IPS) > Palaeoecology
08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Plant Sciences (IPS)

UniBE Contributor:

van der Knaap, Willem Oscar

Subjects:

500 Science > 580 Plants (Botany)

ISSN:

0305-0270

Publisher:

Wiley

Language:

English

Submitter:

Peter Alfred von Ballmoos-Haas

Date Deposited:

26 Aug 2015 10:15

Last Modified:

20 Dec 2016 11:43

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/jbi.12484

Uncontrolled Keywords:

DNA markers, fossil records, glacial refugia, introgression, Picea abies, Picea obovata, post-glacial colonization

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.71280

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/71280

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