Enamel Surface Changes After Exposure to Bleaching Gels Containing Carbamide Peroxide or Hydrogen Peroxide.

Cvikl, Barbara; Lussi, Adrian; Moritz, Andreas; Flury, Simon (2016). Enamel Surface Changes After Exposure to Bleaching Gels Containing Carbamide Peroxide or Hydrogen Peroxide. Operative dentistry, 41(1), E39-E47. Operative Dentistry, Inc. 10.2341/15-010-L

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OBJECTIVE This study evaluated the differences in enamel color change, surface hardness, elastic modulus, and surface roughness between treatments with four bleaching gels containing carbamide peroxide (two at 10% and one each at 35%, and 45%) and two bleaching gels containing hydrogen peroxide (two at 40%). METHODS Enamel specimens were bleached and color changes were measured. Color change was calculated using either ΔE or the Bleaching Index (BI). Then, surface hardness, elastic modulus, and surface roughness of the enamel specimens were evaluated. All measurements were performed at baseline and directly after the first bleaching treatment for all carbamide peroxide- and hydrogen peroxide-containing bleaching gels. In addition, final measurements were made 24 hours after each of a total of 10 bleaching treatments for carbamide peroxide bleaching gels, and 1 week after each of a total of three bleaching treatments for hydrogen peroxide bleaching gels. RESULTS After the last bleaching treatment, respective ΔE scores were 17.6 and 8.2 for the two 10% carbamide peroxide gels, 12.9 and 5.6 for the 45% and 35% carbamide peroxide gels, and 9.6 and 13.9 for the two 40% hydrogen peroxide gels. The respective BI scores were -2.0 and -2.0 for the two 10% carbamide peroxide gels, -3.5 and -1.5 for the 45% and 35% carbamide peroxide gels, and -2.0 and -3.0 for the two 40% hydrogen peroxide gels. Each bleaching gel treatment resulted in significant whitening; however, no significant difference was found among the gels after the last bleaching. Whitening occurred within the first bleaching treatments and did not increase significantly during the remaining treatments. Surface hardness significantly decreased after the last bleaching treatment, when 10% carbamide peroxide was used. Furthermore, significant changes in the elastic modulus or surface roughness occurred only after treatment with 10% carbamide peroxide. CONCLUSION All six bleaching gels effectively bleached the enamel specimens independent of their concentration of peroxide. Gels with low peroxide concentration and longer contact time negatively affected the enamel surface.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > School of Dental Medicine > Department of Preventive, Restorative and Pediatric Dentistry

UniBE Contributor:

Cvikl, Barbara; Lussi, Adrian and Flury, Simon

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0361-7734

Publisher:

Operative Dentistry, Inc.

Language:

English

Submitter:

Simon Flury

Date Deposited:

19 Oct 2015 09:53

Last Modified:

19 Jan 2016 01:30

Publisher DOI:

10.2341/15-010-L

PubMed ID:

26449590

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/72286

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