Using the theory of planned behaviour to model antecedents of surgical checklist use: a cross-sectional study.

Mascherek, Anna C; Gehring, Katrin; Bezzola, Paula; Schwappach, David L B (2015). Using the theory of planned behaviour to model antecedents of surgical checklist use: a cross-sectional study. BMC health services research, 15(1), p. 462. BioMed Central 10.1186/s12913-015-1122-7

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BACKGROUND

Compliance with surgical checklist use remains an obstacle in the context of checklist implementation programs. The theory of planned behaviour was applied to analyse attitudes, perceived behaviour control, and norms as psychological antecedents of individuals' intentions to use the checklist.

METHODS

A cross-sectional survey study with staff (N = 866) of 10 Swiss hospitals was conducted in German and French. Group mean differences between individuals with and without managerial function were computed. Structural equation modelling and confirmatory factor analysis was applied to investigate the structural relation between attitudes, perceived behaviour control, norms, and intentions.

RESULTS

Significant mean differences in favour of individuals with managerial function emerged for norms, perceived behavioural control, and intentions, but not for attitudes. Attitudes and perceived behavioural control had a significant direct effect on intentions whereas norms had not.

CONCLUSIONS

Individuals with managerial function exhibit stronger perceived behavioural control, stronger norms, and stronger intentions. This could be applied in facilitating checklist implementation. The structural model of the theory of planned behaviour remains stable across groups, indicating a valid model to describe antecedents of intentions in the context of surgical checklist implementation.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine (ISPM)

UniBE Contributor:

Schwappach, David

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology > 360 Social problems & social services

ISSN:

1472-6963

Publisher:

BioMed Central

Language:

English

Submitter:

Doris Kopp Heim

Date Deposited:

15 Oct 2015 14:57

Last Modified:

10 Sep 2017 18:26

Publisher DOI:

10.1186/s12913-015-1122-7

PubMed ID:

26445492

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.72393

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/72393

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