Resistance to Temptation: The Interaction of External and Internal Control on Alcohol Use During Residential Treatment for Alcohol Use Disorder

Soravia, Leila M.; Schläfli, K; Stutz, S; Rösner, S; Moggi, Franz (2015). Resistance to Temptation: The Interaction of External and Internal Control on Alcohol Use During Residential Treatment for Alcohol Use Disorder. Alcoholism, clinical and experimental research, 39(11), pp. 2209-2214. Wiley 10.1111/acer.12880

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Background: There is evidence that drinking during residential treatment is related to various factors, such as patients’ general control beliefs and self-efficacy, as well as to external control of alcohol use by program’s staff and situations where there is temptation to drink. As alcohol use during treatment has been shown to be associated with the resumption of alcohol use after discharge from residential treatment, we aimed to investigate how these variables are related to alcohol use during abstinenceoriented residential treatment programs for alcohol use disorders (AUD). Methods: In total, 509 patients who entered 1 of 2 residential abstinence-oriented treatment programs for AUD were included in the study. After detoxification, patients completed a standardized diagnostic procedure including interviews and questionnaires. Drinking was assessed by patients’ selfreport of at least 1 standard drink or by positive breathalyzer testing. The 2 residential programs were categorized as high or low control according to the average number of tests per patient. Results: Regression analysis revealed a significant interaction effect between internal and external control suggesting that patients with high internal locus of control and high frequency of control by staff demonstrated the least alcohol use during treatment (16.7%) while patients with low internal locus of control in programs with low external control were more likely to use alcohol during Treatment (45.9%). No effects were found for self-efficacy and temptation. Conclusions: As alcohol use during treatment is most likely associated with poor treatment outcomes, external control may improve treatment outcomes and particularly support patients with low internal locus of control, who show the highest risk for alcohol use during treatment. High external control may complement high internal control to improve alcohol use prevention while in treatment. Key Words: Alcohol Dependence, Alcohol Use, Locus of Control, Alcohol Testing.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Management
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Psychiatric Neurophysiology (discontinued)
04 Faculty of Medicine > Other Institutions > Teaching Staff, Faculty of Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Psychotherapy

UniBE Contributor:

Soravia, Leila and Moggi, Franz

ISSN:

1530-0277

Publisher:

Wiley

Funders:

Organisations 202 not found.

Projects:

[UNSPECIFIED] How wet are inpatient alcohol clinics

Language:

English

Submitter:

Leila Soravia

Date Deposited:

02 Dec 2015 10:45

Last Modified:

11 Jan 2016 12:10

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/acer.12880

PubMed ID:

26503067

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.72812

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/72812

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