Predictors and overestimation of recalled mobile phone use among children and adolescents

Aydin, Denis; Feychting, Maria; Schüz, Joachim; Andersen, Tina Veje; Poulsen, Aslak Harbo; Prochazka, Michaela; Klæboe, Lars; Kuehni, Claudia E; Tynes, Tore; Röösli, Martin (2011). Predictors and overestimation of recalled mobile phone use among children and adolescents. Progress in biophysics and molecular biology, 107(3), pp. 356-61. Kidlington, UK: Elsevier Science 10.1016/j.pbiomolbio.2011.08.013

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A growing body of literature addresses possible health effects of mobile phone use in children and adolescents by relying on the study participants' retrospective reconstruction of mobile phone use. In this study, we used data from the international case-control study CEFALO to compare self-reported with objectively operator-recorded mobile phone use. The aim of the study was to assess predictors of level of mobile phone use as well as factors that are associated with overestimating own mobile phone use. For cumulative number and duration of calls as well as for time since first subscription we calculated the ratio of self-reported to operator-recorded mobile phone use. We used multiple linear regression models to assess possible predictors of the average number and duration of calls per day and logistic regression models to assess possible predictors of overestimation. The cumulative number and duration of calls as well as the time since first subscription of mobile phones were overestimated on average by the study participants. Likelihood to overestimate number and duration of calls was not significantly different for controls compared to cases (OR=1.1, 95%-CI: 0.5 to 2.5 and OR=1.9, 95%-CI: 0.85 to 4.3, respectively). However, likelihood to overestimate was associated with other health related factors such as age and sex. As a consequence, such factors act as confounders in studies relying solely on self-reported mobile phone use and have to be considered in the analysis.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine (ISPM)

UniBE Contributor:

Kühni, Claudia

ISSN:

0079-6107

Publisher:

Elsevier Science

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:22

Last Modified:

05 Jun 2015 11:32

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.pbiomolbio.2011.08.013

PubMed ID:

21907731

Web of Science ID:

000298722200009

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.7384

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/7384 (FactScience: 212606)

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