Famine responses in the world food crisis 1972–5 and the World Food Conference of 1974

Gerlach, Christian (2015). Famine responses in the world food crisis 1972–5 and the World Food Conference of 1974. European review of history / Revue européenne d'histoire, 22(6), pp. 929-939. Taylor & Francis 10.1080/13507486.2015.1048191

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In the early 1970s, there was scarcity in the world grain market, soaring prices and famines in several countries of Asia and Africa. The commercial grain trade was expanded at the expense of food aid. After a brief look at policies addressing the situation in terms of modernised methods of agricultural production for small producers, the article sketches how such policies also affected relief efforts, from the low availability for food aid, the provision of food that was not useful and late deliveries through efforts to tie food aid to local changes in agricultural production and settlement patterns. In part, food aid thus reinforced processes of social differentiation that had contributed to causing the famines in the first place.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

06 Faculty of Humanities > Department of History and Archaeology > Institute of History
06 Faculty of Humanities > Department of History and Archaeology > Institute of History > Modern and Contemporary History

UniBE Contributor:

Gerlach, Christian

Subjects:

900 History

ISSN:

1350-7486

Publisher:

Taylor & Francis

Language:

English

Submitter:

Hans Christian Gerlach

Date Deposited:

05 Jan 2016 16:56

Last Modified:

26 Jun 2016 02:09

Publisher DOI:

10.1080/13507486.2015.1048191

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/74384

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