The role of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 in the pathogenesis of mood disorders and addiction: combining preclinical evidence with human Positron Emission Tomography (PET) studies.

Terbeck, Sylvia; Akkus, Funda; Chesterman, Laurence P; Hasler, Gregor (2015). The role of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 in the pathogenesis of mood disorders and addiction: combining preclinical evidence with human Positron Emission Tomography (PET) studies. Frontiers in neuroscience, 9, p. 86. Frontiers Research Foundation 10.3389/fnins.2015.00086

[img]
Preview
Text
Terbeck_Hasler_2015_mGluR5_psychiatry_review.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons: Attribution (CC-BY).

Download (584kB) | Preview

In the present review, we deliver an overview of the involvement of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) activity and density in pathological anxiety, mood disorders and addiction. Specifically, we will describe mGluR5 studies in humans that employed Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and combined the findings with preclinical animal research. This combined view of different methodological approaches-from basic neurobiological approaches to human studies-might give a more comprehensive and clinically relevant view of mGluR5 function in mental health than the view on preclinical data alone. We will also review the current research data on mGluR5 along the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC). Firstly, we found evidence of abnormal glutamate activity related to the positive and negative valence systems, which would suggest that antagonistic mGluR5 intervention has prominent anti-addictive, anti-depressive and anxiolytic effects. Secondly, there is evidence that mGluR5 plays an important role in systems for social functioning and the response to social stress. Finally, mGluR5's important role in sleep homeostasis suggests that this glutamate receptor may play an important role in RDoC's arousal and modulatory systems domain. Glutamate was previously mostly investigated in non-human studies, however initial human clinical PET research now also supports the hypothesis that, by mediating brain excitability, neuroplasticity and social cognition, abnormal metabotropic glutamate activity might predispose individuals to a broad range of psychiatric problems.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Review Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Healthcare Research

UniBE Contributor:

Akkus, Funda and Hasler, Gregor

Subjects:

600 Technology
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1662-4548

Publisher:

Frontiers Research Foundation

Language:

English

Submitter:

Gregor Hasler

Date Deposited:

23 Dec 2015 09:04

Last Modified:

30 Dec 2016 11:32

Publisher DOI:

10.3389/fnins.2015.00086

PubMed ID:

25852460

Uncontrolled Keywords:

PET; addiction; anxiety; mGluR5; mood disorders

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.74435

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/74435

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback