Cognitive remediation therapy: Does it generalize to significant outcome areas?

Roder, Volker; Müller, Daniel (2015). Cognitive remediation therapy: Does it generalize to significant outcome areas? Schizophrenia bulletin, 41(suppl1), p. 188. Oxford University Press

Objective: Cognitive remediation therapy (CRT) approaches have demonstrated to be effective in improving cognitive functions in schizophrenia. However, there is a lack of integrated CR approaches that target multiple neuro- and social-cognitive domains with a special focus on the generalization of therapy effects to functional outcome and negative symptoms. Method: This 8-site randomized controlled trial evaluated the efficacy of a novel cognitive-behavioral group therapy approach called integrated neurocognitive therapy (INT). INT includes manual-based exercises to improve all neuro- and social-cognitive domains as defined by the Measurement And Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia (MATRICS) initiative by compensation and restitution. One hundred and fifty-six outpatients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder accord- ing to DSM-IV-TR were randomly assigned to receive 15 weeks of INT or treatment as usual (TAU). INT patients received 30 bi-weekly therapy sessions. Each session lasted 90min. Mixed models were applied to assess changes in neurocognition, social cognition, symptoms, and functional outcome at post-treatment and at 9-month follow-up. Results: Compared to TAU, INT patients showed significant improvements on multiple neuro- and social-cognitive domains, negative symptoms, and functional outcome after therapy and at 9-month follow-up. Number-needed-to-treat analyses indicate that only five INT patients are necessary to produce durable and meaningful improvements in functional outcome. Conclusions: Integrated interventions on neurocognition and social cognition have the potential to improve not only cognitive performance but also functional outcome and negative symptoms. These findings are important as treatment guidelines for schizophrenia have criticized CRT for their poor generalization effects.

Item Type:

Conference or Workshop Item (Abstract)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Management
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Psychotherapy

UniBE Contributor:

Roder, Volker and Müller, Daniel

Subjects:

100 Philosophy > 150 Psychology

ISSN:

0586-7614

Publisher:

Oxford University Press

Language:

English

Submitter:

Daniel Müller

Date Deposited:

07 Jan 2016 15:25

Last Modified:

22 Mar 2016 08:40

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/74476

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