Longitudinal extension of myelomalacia by intramedullary and subdural hemorrhage in a canine model of spinal cord injury

Henke, Diana; Gorgas, Daniela; Doherr, Marcus; Howard, J.; Forterre, Franck; Vandevelde, Marc (2016). Longitudinal extension of myelomalacia by intramedullary and subdural hemorrhage in a canine model of spinal cord injury. Spine Journal, 16(1), pp. 82-90. Elsevier 10.1016/j.spinee.2015.09.018

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BACKGROUND CONTEXT In canine intervertebral disc (IVD) extrusion, a spontaneous animal model of spinal cord injury, hemorrhage is a consistent finding. In rodent models, hemorrhage might be involved in secondary tissue destruction by biochemical mechanisms. PURPOSE This study aimed to investigate a causal association between the extents of intramedullary, subdural and epidural hemorrhage and the severity of spinal cord damage following IVD extrusion in dogs. STUDY DESIGN/SETTING A retrospective study using histologic spinal cord sections from 83 dogs euthanized following IVD extrusion was carried out. METHODS The degree of hemorrhage (intramedullary, subdural, epidural), the degree of spinal cord damage in the epicenter (white and gray matter), and the longitudinal extent of myelomalacia were graded. Associations between the extent of hemorrhage and the degree of spinal cord damage were evaluated statistically. RESULTS Intramedullary and subdural hemorrhages were significantly associated with the degree of white (p<.001/ p=.004) and gray (both p<.001) matter damage, and with the longitudinal extension of myelomalacia (p<.001/p=.005). Intriguingly, accumulation of hemorrhagic cord debris inside or dorsal to a distended and ruptured central canal in segments distant to the epicenter of the lesion was observed exhibiting a wave-like pattern on longitudinal assessment. The occurrence of this debris accumulation was associated with high degrees of tissue destruction (all p<.001). CONCLUSIONS Tissue liquefaction and increased intramedullary pressure associated with hemorrhage are involved in the progression of spinal cord destruction in a canine model of spinal cord injury and ascending or descending myelomalacia. Functional and dynamic studies are needed to investigate this concept further.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Research Foci > NeuroCenter
05 Veterinary Medicine > Research Foci > Veterinary Public Health / Herd Health Management
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > DKV - Clinical Neurology
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV)
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > Small Animal Clinic > Small Animal Clinic, Surgery
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > DKV - Clinical Radiology
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > DKV - Central Clinical Laboratory
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > Small Animal Clinic
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH) > Veterinary Public Health Institute
05 Veterinary Medicine > Other Institutions > Emeriti, Vetsuisse Faculty
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH)

UniBE Contributor:

Henke, Diana; Schweizer, Daniela Esther; Doherr, Marcus; Howard, Judith; Forterre, Franck and Vandevelde, Marc

Subjects:

600 Technology > 630 Agriculture
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1529-9430, 1878-1632

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Simone Forterre

Date Deposited:

08 Feb 2016 09:57

Last Modified:

11 Oct 2018 16:59

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.spinee.2015.09.018

PubMed ID:

26386168

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Ascending; Central canal; Descending; Intervertebral disc extrusion; Intramedullary pressure; Spinal trauma

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.75135

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/75135

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