Evaluation of Medical Students’ Attitudes and Performance of Basic Surgery Skills in a Training Program Using Fresh Human skin, Excised During Body Contouring Surgeries

Rothenberger, Jens; Seyed Jafari, Seyed Morteza; Schnabel, Kai; Tschumi, Christian; Angermeier, Sarina; Shafighi, Maziar (2015). Evaluation of Medical Students’ Attitudes and Performance of Basic Surgery Skills in a Training Program Using Fresh Human skin, Excised During Body Contouring Surgeries. Journal of surgical education, 72(5), pp. 868-874. Elsevier 10.1016/j.jsurg.2015.03.004

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BACKGROUND: Learning surgical skills in the operating room may be a challenge for medical students. Therefore, more approaches using simulation to enable students to develop their practical skills are required. OBJECTIVES: We hypothesized that (1) there would be a need for additional surgical training for medical students in the pre-final year, and (2) our basic surgery skills training program using fresh human skin would improve medical students' surgical skills. DESIGN: We conducted a preliminary survey of medical students to clarify the need for further training in basic surgery procedures. A new approach using simulation to teach surgical skills on human skin was set up. The procedural skills of 15 randomly selected students were assessed in the operating room before and after participation in the simulation, using Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills. Furthermore, subjective assessment was performed based on students' self-evaluation. The data were analyzed using SPSS, version 21 (SPSS, Inc., Chicago, IL). SETTING: The study took place at the Inselspital, Bern University Hospital. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 186 pre-final-year medical students were enrolled into the preliminary survey; 15 randomly selected medical students participated in the basic surgical skills training course on the fresh human skin operating room. RESULTS: The preliminary survey revealed the need for a surgical skills curriculum. The simulation approach we developed showed significant (p < 0.001) improvement for all 12 surgical skills, with mean cumulative precourse and postcourse values of 31.25 ± 5.013 and 45.38 ± 3.557, respectively. The self-evaluation contained positive feedback as well. CONCLUSION: Simulation of surgery using human tissue samples could help medical students become more proficient in handling surgical instruments before stepping into a real surgical situation. We suggest further studies evaluating our proposed teaching method and the possibility of integrating this simulation approach into the medical school curriculum.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Medical Education > Institute for Medical Education
04 Faculty of Medicine > Medical Education > Institute for Medical Education > Education and Media Unit (AUM)

UniBE Contributor:

Schnabel, Kai

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1931-7204

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Eveline Götschmann-Meile

Date Deposited:

02 Mar 2016 13:39

Last Modified:

16 Jan 2017 14:58

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.jsurg.2015.03.004

PubMed ID:

25891499

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Medical Knowledge; Patient Care; Practice-Based Learning and Improvement; basic surgery skills; fresh human skin; medical education; postbariatric surgeries; training

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.75327

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/75327

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